The passing of my dad, Rev. Dr. Lloyd E. Marcus

My dad, Dr. Rev. Lloyd E. Marcus, passed away at age 90, June 1, 2018.

The day before Dad died, my four siblings and I gathered around his bed, told him we loved him, told him he did a great job raising us, and told him we would be okay.  It was awesome.

We laughed a lot sharing personal experiences with Dad.  My brother Jerry said when he was 13, he began walking with the popular black-dude swagger of the day.  Dad asked, "What's wrong with your leg?"  Jerry said, "I'm a man."  Dad replied, "A man pays his own way.  As long as you are living under my roof, you are not a man."  We all laughed, because that was classic Dad.  He was never harsh or mean.  Dad simply instilled personal responsibility in my sister, my three brothers, and me.  We kids laughed and joked with Dad often while always respecting him.

Folks are probably sick of me writing about Dad's achievements as a trailblazer of civil rights.  Dad was among the first handful of blacks to become Baltimore City firefighters, winning "Firefighter of the Year" two times.  Dad was Baltimore's first black paramedic and first black fire department chaplain.

I shared with my siblings that while I strive to be a good man, Dad's passing compels me to be an even better man in honor of Dad's legacy.  My siblings said they feel the same.

wrote and recorded this song honoring Dad 20 years ago.  My buddy Doug Balch surprised me with the production of this music video.  Enjoy! 

Lloyd Marcus, The Unhyphenated American
Help Lloyd spread the Truth.
http://LloydMarcus.com

My dad, Dr. Rev. Lloyd E. Marcus, passed away at age 90, June 1, 2018.

The day before Dad died, my four siblings and I gathered around his bed, told him we loved him, told him he did a great job raising us, and told him we would be okay.  It was awesome.

We laughed a lot sharing personal experiences with Dad.  My brother Jerry said when he was 13, he began walking with the popular black-dude swagger of the day.  Dad asked, "What's wrong with your leg?"  Jerry said, "I'm a man."  Dad replied, "A man pays his own way.  As long as you are living under my roof, you are not a man."  We all laughed, because that was classic Dad.  He was never harsh or mean.  Dad simply instilled personal responsibility in my sister, my three brothers, and me.  We kids laughed and joked with Dad often while always respecting him.

Folks are probably sick of me writing about Dad's achievements as a trailblazer of civil rights.  Dad was among the first handful of blacks to become Baltimore City firefighters, winning "Firefighter of the Year" two times.  Dad was Baltimore's first black paramedic and first black fire department chaplain.

I shared with my siblings that while I strive to be a good man, Dad's passing compels me to be an even better man in honor of Dad's legacy.  My siblings said they feel the same.

wrote and recorded this song honoring Dad 20 years ago.  My buddy Doug Balch surprised me with the production of this music video.  Enjoy! 

Lloyd Marcus, The Unhyphenated American
Help Lloyd spread the Truth.
http://LloydMarcus.com