Comey's weaselly tweet on the IG report

James Comey tried to get in front of the I.G. report with a tweet sent around the time the report was made publicly available.  He knew exactly what it was going to say because he had the opportunity to dispute and probably edit or even cut portions dealing with him.

This is classic Comey, grabbing control with the role of initiator of the project and calling the conclusions reasonable.  Not attacking the I.G.'s office, but thanking it.  They are people of good faith.  Such a nice, honest man, what we used to call a Boy Scout back when we had the Boy Scouts.

 

But of course, we're all so reasonable that we concede that Comey is of good faith, too, and people of good faith can "see an unprecedented situation differently."

Instead of the subject of serious criticism – insubordination is a big deal! – after an exhaustive investigation, Comey establishes himself as an equal to the I.G., and he just sees things differently, as reasonable people do.

It hit me today who James Comey reminds me of: Eddie Haskell.

Eddie Haskell was a character on Leave It to Beaver, a 1950s television series.  Wikipedia describes his character:

Eddie Haskell was the smart-mouthed best-friend of Wally Cleaver.  The character, played in the original series by Ken Osmond, has become a cultural reference, recognized as an archetype for insincere sycophants.  Ward Cleaver once remarked that "[Eddie] is so polite, it's almost un-American".

Eddie was known for his neat grooming – hiding his shallow and sneaky character.  Typically, Eddie would greet his friends' parents with overdone good manners and often a compliment such as, "That's a lovely dress you're wearing, Mrs. Cleaver."  However, when no parents were around, Eddie was always up to no good – either conniving with his friends or picking on Wally's younger brother, Beaver.  Eddie's duplicity was also exemplified in his efforts to curry favor by trying to talk to adults at the level he thought they would respect, such as referring to their children as Theodore (Beaver's much-disliked given name) and Wallace, even though the parents called them Beaver and Wally.

 

 

James Comey tried to get in front of the I.G. report with a tweet sent around the time the report was made publicly available.  He knew exactly what it was going to say because he had the opportunity to dispute and probably edit or even cut portions dealing with him.

This is classic Comey, grabbing control with the role of initiator of the project and calling the conclusions reasonable.  Not attacking the I.G.'s office, but thanking it.  They are people of good faith.  Such a nice, honest man, what we used to call a Boy Scout back when we had the Boy Scouts.

 

But of course, we're all so reasonable that we concede that Comey is of good faith, too, and people of good faith can "see an unprecedented situation differently."

Instead of the subject of serious criticism – insubordination is a big deal! – after an exhaustive investigation, Comey establishes himself as an equal to the I.G., and he just sees things differently, as reasonable people do.

It hit me today who James Comey reminds me of: Eddie Haskell.

Eddie Haskell was a character on Leave It to Beaver, a 1950s television series.  Wikipedia describes his character:

Eddie Haskell was the smart-mouthed best-friend of Wally Cleaver.  The character, played in the original series by Ken Osmond, has become a cultural reference, recognized as an archetype for insincere sycophants.  Ward Cleaver once remarked that "[Eddie] is so polite, it's almost un-American".

Eddie was known for his neat grooming – hiding his shallow and sneaky character.  Typically, Eddie would greet his friends' parents with overdone good manners and often a compliment such as, "That's a lovely dress you're wearing, Mrs. Cleaver."  However, when no parents were around, Eddie was always up to no good – either conniving with his friends or picking on Wally's younger brother, Beaver.  Eddie's duplicity was also exemplified in his efforts to curry favor by trying to talk to adults at the level he thought they would respect, such as referring to their children as Theodore (Beaver's much-disliked given name) and Wallace, even though the parents called them Beaver and Wally.