Wondering why so many are homeschooling their children?

We learned this week about a new U.S. history book, By the People: A History of the United States by James Fraser, being peddled to school districts.  Specifically, the book raised a few eyebrows because of its explanation about the 2016 election.

This is the story:

The final section of the book, titled "The Angry Election of 2016," is highly critical of Trump.

"Most thought that Trump was too extreme a candidate to win the nomination, but his extremism, his anti-establishment rhetoric, and, some said, his not-very-hidden racism connected with a significant number of primary voters," Fraser wrote.

Trump voters are described as "mostly older, often rural or suburban, and overwhelmingly white" while the book uses the viewpoint of Clinton voters to describe Trump's supporters as fearful, backwards, sexist people who supported a mentally ill candidate.

"Clinton's supporters feared that the election had been determined by people who were afraid of a rapidly developing ethnic diversity of the country, discomfort with their candidate's gender, and nostalgia for an earlier time in the nation's history," the textbook says.

"They also worried about the mental stability of the president-elect and the anger that he and his supporters brought to the nation."

Well, what can you say?

Do you think we will ever have an explanation of President Obama's election pointing out that his votes came from people who believe in abortion, even abortion after 20 weeks?  Or angry people who shut down conservative speakers?  Or people who believe that cities can decide what federal law applies to them or not?

My message to parents in public schools is to get involved and read what your kids are reading in school.  Confront your teachers or school administrations and demand answers to your questions.

Don't assume that your kids are learning how to read and write.  They may be spending their time wondering about their gender or hearing from people who hate the U.S.

PS: You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.

We learned this week about a new U.S. history book, By the People: A History of the United States by James Fraser, being peddled to school districts.  Specifically, the book raised a few eyebrows because of its explanation about the 2016 election.

This is the story:

The final section of the book, titled "The Angry Election of 2016," is highly critical of Trump.

"Most thought that Trump was too extreme a candidate to win the nomination, but his extremism, his anti-establishment rhetoric, and, some said, his not-very-hidden racism connected with a significant number of primary voters," Fraser wrote.

Trump voters are described as "mostly older, often rural or suburban, and overwhelmingly white" while the book uses the viewpoint of Clinton voters to describe Trump's supporters as fearful, backwards, sexist people who supported a mentally ill candidate.

"Clinton's supporters feared that the election had been determined by people who were afraid of a rapidly developing ethnic diversity of the country, discomfort with their candidate's gender, and nostalgia for an earlier time in the nation's history," the textbook says.

"They also worried about the mental stability of the president-elect and the anger that he and his supporters brought to the nation."

Well, what can you say?

Do you think we will ever have an explanation of President Obama's election pointing out that his votes came from people who believe in abortion, even abortion after 20 weeks?  Or angry people who shut down conservative speakers?  Or people who believe that cities can decide what federal law applies to them or not?

My message to parents in public schools is to get involved and read what your kids are reading in school.  Confront your teachers or school administrations and demand answers to your questions.

Don't assume that your kids are learning how to read and write.  They may be spending their time wondering about their gender or hearing from people who hate the U.S.

PS: You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.