University of Texas to treat masculinity as a 'mental health issue'

A new program at the University of Texas Counseling and Mental Health Center will promote "healthy masculinity" through "public events, educational workshops, and other forms of student involvement."

The goal is "to impact campus culture to increase acceptance of gender diversity, promote healthy relationships with an emphasis on consent, and prevent interpersonal violence."

PJ Media:

The program is predicated on a critique of so-called “restrictive masculinity.” Men, the program argues, suffer when they are told to “act like a man” or when they are encouraged to fulfill traditional gender roles, such as being “successful” or “the breadwinner.”

Though you might enjoy “taking care of people” or being “active,” MasculinUTwarns that many of these attributes are actually dangerous, claiming that “traditional ideas of masculinity place men into rigid (or restrictive) boxes [which]... prevent them from developing their emotional maturity.”

“If you are a male student at UT reading this right now, we hope that learning about this helps you not to feel guilty about having participated in these definitions of masculinity, and instead feel empowered to break the cycle!” the program offers. 

Please. Make it stop.

The program is currently without leadership, but not for long. The school is in the process of hiring a “healthy masculinities coordinator” to run the program, and a school official tells PJ Media that some hopeful hirees are interviewing for the position later this week.

While many schools now have similar programs, this appears to be the first run directly out of a Counseling and Mental Health Center. Though the school seems to justify this by claiming that masculinity can cause men to lash out at other people and themselves, the school did not respond to a request for comment to clarify.

What is "healthy masculinity? This poster will give you an idea.

"Flowers in their beard or something"? This is "healthy"? Yikes.

Here's the clincher:

There is no evidence that masculinity itself contributes to violence. Universities that run similar programs, such as UNC-Chapel Hill and Northwestern, have admittedthat their programming isn’t supported by any evidence.

Yes, but men sure look pretty with flowers in their beards, don't they? 

This is just another effort by the left to deny or try to change human nature. It would be funny if it weren't so futile. There are physical, biological, and chemical attributes men have that women don't. No amount of "healthy masculinity" programs will alter that singular fact.

There are men who act like pigs and there are men who are a genuine threat to women. But it's not because of their "masculinity" but rather the male role models they had growing up. There is nothing inherent in being a man that causes them to treat women and others disrespectfully or unkindly. 

That an institution of higher learning should ignore that is beyond belief.

A new program at the University of Texas Counseling and Mental Health Center will promote "healthy masculinity" through "public events, educational workshops, and other forms of student involvement."

The goal is "to impact campus culture to increase acceptance of gender diversity, promote healthy relationships with an emphasis on consent, and prevent interpersonal violence."

PJ Media:

The program is predicated on a critique of so-called “restrictive masculinity.” Men, the program argues, suffer when they are told to “act like a man” or when they are encouraged to fulfill traditional gender roles, such as being “successful” or “the breadwinner.”

Though you might enjoy “taking care of people” or being “active,” MasculinUTwarns that many of these attributes are actually dangerous, claiming that “traditional ideas of masculinity place men into rigid (or restrictive) boxes [which]... prevent them from developing their emotional maturity.”

“If you are a male student at UT reading this right now, we hope that learning about this helps you not to feel guilty about having participated in these definitions of masculinity, and instead feel empowered to break the cycle!” the program offers. 

Please. Make it stop.

The program is currently without leadership, but not for long. The school is in the process of hiring a “healthy masculinities coordinator” to run the program, and a school official tells PJ Media that some hopeful hirees are interviewing for the position later this week.

While many schools now have similar programs, this appears to be the first run directly out of a Counseling and Mental Health Center. Though the school seems to justify this by claiming that masculinity can cause men to lash out at other people and themselves, the school did not respond to a request for comment to clarify.

What is "healthy masculinity? This poster will give you an idea.

"Flowers in their beard or something"? This is "healthy"? Yikes.

Here's the clincher:

There is no evidence that masculinity itself contributes to violence. Universities that run similar programs, such as UNC-Chapel Hill and Northwestern, have admittedthat their programming isn’t supported by any evidence.

Yes, but men sure look pretty with flowers in their beards, don't they? 

This is just another effort by the left to deny or try to change human nature. It would be funny if it weren't so futile. There are physical, biological, and chemical attributes men have that women don't. No amount of "healthy masculinity" programs will alter that singular fact.

There are men who act like pigs and there are men who are a genuine threat to women. But it's not because of their "masculinity" but rather the male role models they had growing up. There is nothing inherent in being a man that causes them to treat women and others disrespectfully or unkindly. 

That an institution of higher learning should ignore that is beyond belief.