Over at YouTube, cartel hit men, si – conservatives, no

Just to put the social media problem vis-à-vis conservatives into perspective:

Early this week, a Mexican rapper named Christian Omar Palma Gutierrez, stage name "QBA," confessed to prosecutors in Jalisco state, Mexico that he had aided a local drug cartel in a kidnapping and murder by dissolving the bodies of the three victims in sulfuric acid.

The three – Salomon Aceves Gastelum, 25; Daniel Diaz, 20; and Marco Avalos, 20 – were college students and had absolutely nothing to do with drugs.  The New Generation drug cartel, active in Jalisco, mistook the three for members of a rival drug gang, kidnapped them while disguised as cops, and tortured them in an effort to get them to confess.  One was beaten so badly that he died, requiring that the others be killed as well.  No hay testigos.  ¿Verdad, amigo?

That's where QBA stepped in – if he hadn't, in fact, been involved from the first, which is a distinct possibility.  It seems that he had been working for the New Generation mob for some time, earning 3,000 pesos (roughly $159) a week.  Evidently, Mexico is not as rewarding to rappers as the States.

Nor is this QBA's first effort as an accessory to murder.  According to chief investigator Lizette Torres, "[h]e has participated in three other previous murders."

Being a rapper, QBA has a large social media presence, specifically on YouTube, with a channel, "QBA OfIcial," featuring 67 videos and boasting over 120,000 subscribers.  (This has apparently dropped by nearly 5,000 since the crime was announced – all praise to those good people.)

Knowing that YouTube is so eager to police the morals of its viewers and protect them from noxious influences, I accessed the site secure in the knowledge that the YouTube powers must have scrubbed the site of any trace of this nasty lowlife.

But lo and behold, playmates – what did I find instead?  QBA's channel, along with all 67 videos, still up and running, accessible to any questing snowflake at the click of a mouse.

So, according to YouTube, a thug accused of a crime almost too ghastly to contemplate, on behalf of a Mexican drug cartel – an organization that nearly matches ISIS and Hamas for sheer foulness – meets the standards of the net's premier video-sharing site.

It's a good thing QBA didn't do something truly unforgiveable, like criticize illegal aliens, characterize Muslims as terrorists, or recommend that Planned Parenthood be defunded.

Maybe Milo should start a drug cartel.  What do you think?

Just to put the social media problem vis-à-vis conservatives into perspective:

Early this week, a Mexican rapper named Christian Omar Palma Gutierrez, stage name "QBA," confessed to prosecutors in Jalisco state, Mexico that he had aided a local drug cartel in a kidnapping and murder by dissolving the bodies of the three victims in sulfuric acid.

The three – Salomon Aceves Gastelum, 25; Daniel Diaz, 20; and Marco Avalos, 20 – were college students and had absolutely nothing to do with drugs.  The New Generation drug cartel, active in Jalisco, mistook the three for members of a rival drug gang, kidnapped them while disguised as cops, and tortured them in an effort to get them to confess.  One was beaten so badly that he died, requiring that the others be killed as well.  No hay testigos.  ¿Verdad, amigo?

That's where QBA stepped in – if he hadn't, in fact, been involved from the first, which is a distinct possibility.  It seems that he had been working for the New Generation mob for some time, earning 3,000 pesos (roughly $159) a week.  Evidently, Mexico is not as rewarding to rappers as the States.

Nor is this QBA's first effort as an accessory to murder.  According to chief investigator Lizette Torres, "[h]e has participated in three other previous murders."

Being a rapper, QBA has a large social media presence, specifically on YouTube, with a channel, "QBA OfIcial," featuring 67 videos and boasting over 120,000 subscribers.  (This has apparently dropped by nearly 5,000 since the crime was announced – all praise to those good people.)

Knowing that YouTube is so eager to police the morals of its viewers and protect them from noxious influences, I accessed the site secure in the knowledge that the YouTube powers must have scrubbed the site of any trace of this nasty lowlife.

But lo and behold, playmates – what did I find instead?  QBA's channel, along with all 67 videos, still up and running, accessible to any questing snowflake at the click of a mouse.

So, according to YouTube, a thug accused of a crime almost too ghastly to contemplate, on behalf of a Mexican drug cartel – an organization that nearly matches ISIS and Hamas for sheer foulness – meets the standards of the net's premier video-sharing site.

It's a good thing QBA didn't do something truly unforgiveable, like criticize illegal aliens, characterize Muslims as terrorists, or recommend that Planned Parenthood be defunded.

Maybe Milo should start a drug cartel.  What do you think?