Too much theory in the gun control debate

During the Virginia Tech shooting in 2007, I recall hearing a radio interview with a student who was close to the shooter and was lucky to survive the shooting.  I remember the young man sharing his frustration and saying something like this: I was forced by a gun-free zone to leave my gun in the car and felt hopeless watching a killer kill innocent people.

During the recent South Texas school shooting, we heard survivors say something similar: that a gun could have changed the story.

Unfortunately, too much of the gun control is all about theories – this gun vs. that gun, or whether this weapon looks like a military rifle or not.  In other words, none of the "experts" talking on TV have ever been between a killer's gun and their lives.

The latest nonsense comes from U.S. companies, such as Walmart, who've decided to add their meaningless contributions to the debate.  They will be raising the age to purchase guns or ammunition to 21.  How does this solve anything?  It doesn't.

Furthermore, these companies may not even be in tune with their customers, who are likelier to blame government than guns, as Rasmussen just reported:

Most Americans think government error is more responsible than a lack of gun control for the Valentine's Day massacre at a Florida high school.

The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 54% of American Adults believe the failure of government agencies to respond to numerous warning signs from the prospective killer is more to blame for the mass shooting.  Thirty-three percent (33%) attribute the deaths more to a lack of adequate gun control.  Eleven percent (11%) opt for something else. 

So maybe the public sees all of the talk about "theory," too.  My guess is that most Americans find all of this talk about gun control as irrelevant as I do.  It's all a lot of talk from people who have never been in a room with a killer killing at will.
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PS: You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.

During the Virginia Tech shooting in 2007, I recall hearing a radio interview with a student who was close to the shooter and was lucky to survive the shooting.  I remember the young man sharing his frustration and saying something like this: I was forced by a gun-free zone to leave my gun in the car and felt hopeless watching a killer kill innocent people.

During the recent South Texas school shooting, we heard survivors say something similar: that a gun could have changed the story.

Unfortunately, too much of the gun control is all about theories – this gun vs. that gun, or whether this weapon looks like a military rifle or not.  In other words, none of the "experts" talking on TV have ever been between a killer's gun and their lives.

The latest nonsense comes from U.S. companies, such as Walmart, who've decided to add their meaningless contributions to the debate.  They will be raising the age to purchase guns or ammunition to 21.  How does this solve anything?  It doesn't.

Furthermore, these companies may not even be in tune with their customers, who are likelier to blame government than guns, as Rasmussen just reported:

Most Americans think government error is more responsible than a lack of gun control for the Valentine's Day massacre at a Florida high school.

The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 54% of American Adults believe the failure of government agencies to respond to numerous warning signs from the prospective killer is more to blame for the mass shooting.  Thirty-three percent (33%) attribute the deaths more to a lack of adequate gun control.  Eleven percent (11%) opt for something else. 

So maybe the public sees all of the talk about "theory," too.  My guess is that most Americans find all of this talk about gun control as irrelevant as I do.  It's all a lot of talk from people who have never been in a room with a killer killing at will.
.
PS: You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.