Gotterdammerung for Julian Assange?

Is time up for Julian Assange, the slimy little weasel who acts like a Russian agent as chief WikiLeaker, who specifically co-opted pathetic army private Bradley Manning to leak thousands of U.S. military secrets onto the internet in 2010?  I'm going to make a prediction: yes.

Seems that Assange's protector, the nation of Ecuador, has gotten tired of the little puke and cut off his lines of communication in its London embassy, where Assange has been holed up for years.  Apparently, his Twitter mockery of President Trump's expulsion of 60 Russian diplomats and other sass-off remarks have prompted Ecuador to claim he's interfering with the internal affairs of other countries from his embassy perch, something he promised he wouldn't do, and now the Ecuadorean government has had enough.

AFP reports:

Ecuador on Wednesday said it has stopped Julian Assange's ability to communicate to the outside world from its London embassy, where the WikiLeaks founder has been holed up since 2012.

The decision was taken because the Australian had broken a 2017 promise to not interfere in other countries' affairs while in the mission, an Ecuadoran government statement said without elaborating.

Here's why I think the answer is yes to the question of whether his days are numbered in that embassy and why things don't look to bright for Assange just about now.

Assange got his asylum spot in the embassy based only on the fact that Ecuador's president at the time, Rafael Correa, wanted to twist the tail of the yánqui imperialistas.  Correa was a rabidly left-wing demagogue and open ally of Venezuela's brutal dictator, Hugo Chávez, who earned brownie points with the international left by being as anti-American as possible, something that came naturally to him, given that he was educated in Bill Ayers's University of Illinois system.  The atmosphere of that teaching stuck to him, as did the fact that his father was a deported illegal who trafficked drugs in the states.  He had a lot of reasons to hate America, and he did.

Here's the other thing: Correa lost power.  Citizens nixed a bid to make him dictator for life, as Chávez was able to de facto accomplish, and his successor, a guy named Lenin Moreno (you read that right), is doing all he can to erase Correa's legacy.  Moreno had actually been Correa's vice president for a decade, and once he got elected, he turned, hard, on his patron, and recently torpedoed the man's potential to retake power.  Correa bellowed that Moreno was "a wolf in sheep's clothing."  As this is Ecuador, who knows if Moreno's bid to keep Correa out of power permanently will stick?  Stay or not, Moreno has shown himself to be a man of his words and a power player, busting another of Correa's vice presidents for corruption and taking the death grip of the government off the press and off the judiciary, two areas where corruption and thuggery were rampant, as Correa's Chevron Shakedown showed.  Moreno has gotten popular for doing as he says, according to this excellent piece sorting out the mess of Ecuadoran politics in the Economist.

That bodes ill for Assange, who seems to be strangely acting as a Russian agent from his embassy perch.  Everyone has noticed how he leaks only information favorable to Russian interests for one.  He also contributes to RT News, the Russian propaganda outlet famed for stirring the pot.  Now Assange has gone all in with propelling the Russian position about the expulsion of Russian diplomats over the poisoning of a dissident, and he also got noisy about another Russian pet cause, Catalonia, tweeting about that, too.

Apparently, this doesn't serve Ecuador's interests.  Its president has noticed.  He's cut off Assange's communications as step one.  And this same president has a habit of doing what he says.  My money is on Assange being thrown out and then being scooped up by the London cops.

Is time up for Julian Assange, the slimy little weasel who acts like a Russian agent as chief WikiLeaker, who specifically co-opted pathetic army private Bradley Manning to leak thousands of U.S. military secrets onto the internet in 2010?  I'm going to make a prediction: yes.

Seems that Assange's protector, the nation of Ecuador, has gotten tired of the little puke and cut off his lines of communication in its London embassy, where Assange has been holed up for years.  Apparently, his Twitter mockery of President Trump's expulsion of 60 Russian diplomats and other sass-off remarks have prompted Ecuador to claim he's interfering with the internal affairs of other countries from his embassy perch, something he promised he wouldn't do, and now the Ecuadorean government has had enough.

AFP reports:

Ecuador on Wednesday said it has stopped Julian Assange's ability to communicate to the outside world from its London embassy, where the WikiLeaks founder has been holed up since 2012.

The decision was taken because the Australian had broken a 2017 promise to not interfere in other countries' affairs while in the mission, an Ecuadoran government statement said without elaborating.

Here's why I think the answer is yes to the question of whether his days are numbered in that embassy and why things don't look to bright for Assange just about now.

Assange got his asylum spot in the embassy based only on the fact that Ecuador's president at the time, Rafael Correa, wanted to twist the tail of the yánqui imperialistas.  Correa was a rabidly left-wing demagogue and open ally of Venezuela's brutal dictator, Hugo Chávez, who earned brownie points with the international left by being as anti-American as possible, something that came naturally to him, given that he was educated in Bill Ayers's University of Illinois system.  The atmosphere of that teaching stuck to him, as did the fact that his father was a deported illegal who trafficked drugs in the states.  He had a lot of reasons to hate America, and he did.

Here's the other thing: Correa lost power.  Citizens nixed a bid to make him dictator for life, as Chávez was able to de facto accomplish, and his successor, a guy named Lenin Moreno (you read that right), is doing all he can to erase Correa's legacy.  Moreno had actually been Correa's vice president for a decade, and once he got elected, he turned, hard, on his patron, and recently torpedoed the man's potential to retake power.  Correa bellowed that Moreno was "a wolf in sheep's clothing."  As this is Ecuador, who knows if Moreno's bid to keep Correa out of power permanently will stick?  Stay or not, Moreno has shown himself to be a man of his words and a power player, busting another of Correa's vice presidents for corruption and taking the death grip of the government off the press and off the judiciary, two areas where corruption and thuggery were rampant, as Correa's Chevron Shakedown showed.  Moreno has gotten popular for doing as he says, according to this excellent piece sorting out the mess of Ecuadoran politics in the Economist.

That bodes ill for Assange, who seems to be strangely acting as a Russian agent from his embassy perch.  Everyone has noticed how he leaks only information favorable to Russian interests for one.  He also contributes to RT News, the Russian propaganda outlet famed for stirring the pot.  Now Assange has gone all in with propelling the Russian position about the expulsion of Russian diplomats over the poisoning of a dissident, and he also got noisy about another Russian pet cause, Catalonia, tweeting about that, too.

Apparently, this doesn't serve Ecuador's interests.  Its president has noticed.  He's cut off Assange's communications as step one.  And this same president has a habit of doing what he says.  My money is on Assange being thrown out and then being scooped up by the London cops.