Pocahontas speaks with a forked tongue

At a February meeting of the National Congress of American Indians, Elizabeth Warren doubled down on her assertion that she is 1/32 American Indian.  As to this claim, the liberal Washington Post, in a "Fact Checker" column of 2016, stated that it could come to no conclusion, that "there is no documented proof of Warren's self-proclaimed partial Native American heritage."

So what does the senator from Massachusetts hang her feathered headdress on?  Since she can provide no proof for her Indian heritage, the woman instead cites "family lore."  In any court of law, this type of "evidence" is excluded as hearsay.  Oh, yes, and she adds that she has high cheekbones.  Well, that should certainly settle the matter, right? 

If you think Warren's imagining an Indian heritage for herself is the height of her delusion, you're wrong.  Incredibly, she repeatedly says, "I never used my family tree to get a break or to get ahead."  Although there is zero evidence that Warren has any Indian blood flowing through her veins, there's is plenty to refute her claim that her purported Indian heritage did not give her an advantage in being hired into the Ivy League.  

Let it be noted that Warren herself admits that she told the University of Pennsylvania and Harvard of her Indian claim.

This is significant, to say the least.  One would have to be totally oblivious to the fact that the Ivy League thirsts for candidates to fill its affirmative action quotas as much as a drowning man longs for a breath of air.  In investigating Warren's background, the Boston Globe further noted that her "law degree from Rutgers University made her the only tenured Harvard Law School professor trained at an American public law school."

The inference is inescapable.  Warren saw the affirmative action train coming down the track, hopped aboard, and rode it to positions in the prestigious law schools of the University of Pennsylvania and Harvard.  Does any honest person doubt this?  But Warren says: "No.  I rose to the top on my own brilliance."  She heap bold.

Much ink has been spilled in debating Elizabeth Warren's self-serving claim to Indian heritage.  And attention has also been directed to the mocking of Warren by calling her Pocahontas, as President Trump and Howie Carr have done.  But this is a distraction from the real issue, and that is affirmative action – i.e., quotas for this-and-that group.

In a sane world, a world that followed the Constitution or just one that merely obeyed civil rights legislation, a person with a parentage of 1/32 American Indian would never be given any extra consideration over anyone else.  But today, that is not the case.

Stated clearly as possible, quotas based on race, ethnic background, religion, sexual orientation, or sex are both unconstitutional and immoral.  And it is quotas that Elizabeth Warren must be called out on, along with her blatant lies on her alleged Indian heritage and the obvious and unfair advantage it gave her in academia.

At a February meeting of the National Congress of American Indians, Elizabeth Warren doubled down on her assertion that she is 1/32 American Indian.  As to this claim, the liberal Washington Post, in a "Fact Checker" column of 2016, stated that it could come to no conclusion, that "there is no documented proof of Warren's self-proclaimed partial Native American heritage."

So what does the senator from Massachusetts hang her feathered headdress on?  Since she can provide no proof for her Indian heritage, the woman instead cites "family lore."  In any court of law, this type of "evidence" is excluded as hearsay.  Oh, yes, and she adds that she has high cheekbones.  Well, that should certainly settle the matter, right? 

If you think Warren's imagining an Indian heritage for herself is the height of her delusion, you're wrong.  Incredibly, she repeatedly says, "I never used my family tree to get a break or to get ahead."  Although there is zero evidence that Warren has any Indian blood flowing through her veins, there's is plenty to refute her claim that her purported Indian heritage did not give her an advantage in being hired into the Ivy League.  

Let it be noted that Warren herself admits that she told the University of Pennsylvania and Harvard of her Indian claim.

This is significant, to say the least.  One would have to be totally oblivious to the fact that the Ivy League thirsts for candidates to fill its affirmative action quotas as much as a drowning man longs for a breath of air.  In investigating Warren's background, the Boston Globe further noted that her "law degree from Rutgers University made her the only tenured Harvard Law School professor trained at an American public law school."

The inference is inescapable.  Warren saw the affirmative action train coming down the track, hopped aboard, and rode it to positions in the prestigious law schools of the University of Pennsylvania and Harvard.  Does any honest person doubt this?  But Warren says: "No.  I rose to the top on my own brilliance."  She heap bold.

Much ink has been spilled in debating Elizabeth Warren's self-serving claim to Indian heritage.  And attention has also been directed to the mocking of Warren by calling her Pocahontas, as President Trump and Howie Carr have done.  But this is a distraction from the real issue, and that is affirmative action – i.e., quotas for this-and-that group.

In a sane world, a world that followed the Constitution or just one that merely obeyed civil rights legislation, a person with a parentage of 1/32 American Indian would never be given any extra consideration over anyone else.  But today, that is not the case.

Stated clearly as possible, quotas based on race, ethnic background, religion, sexual orientation, or sex are both unconstitutional and immoral.  And it is quotas that Elizabeth Warren must be called out on, along with her blatant lies on her alleged Indian heritage and the obvious and unfair advantage it gave her in academia.