Liberal reporter knocked down glass, now puzzled at broken glass all over

The headline from Robert J. Samuelson in the WaPo is "Will the economy save Trump?"

I believe that Samuelson is confused.  The headline should be "Thank God for the Trump Economy."

Samuelson obviously recognizes that the economy is good:

People still tend to credit or blame the sitting president for the economy's performance.

For Trump, that's fabulous news.  The economy is thriving, and most mainstream analysts believe [that] it will stay that way through the year.  An improving global economy compounds the effect.

Consider the forecast from IHS Markit, a consulting firm.  It expects U.S. economic growth of 2.6 percent in 2018, better than the 2.3 percent in 2017 and much better than the 1.5 percent in 2016.  The unemployment rate, now 4.1 percent, will drop below 4 percent.  But inflation won't worsen.  For 2018, consumer prices are expected to increase 1.3 percent, down from 2017's 2.1 percent. 

Then Samuelson is confused because he has no idea why the public doesn't recognize that the economy is good and wonders why polarization has intensified.  

What's striking about the current situation is the huge disconnect between what's happening in the economy and what's happening in politics.  Politics is unstable and chaotic.  Polarization has intensified, and Trump has corrupted political debate with his constant, often untrue tweets.  Meanwhile, economic confidence is strong, and the stock market acts as if it has not a worry in the world.

To some extent, the contradictions can be reconciled by Trump's pro-business tax and regulatory policies.  But the gap is too wide for this to be a fully adequate explanation.

This shows that Samuelson either doesn't read or can't comprehend that when 95% of the articles on Trump are negative, no matter what he does (especially in Samuleson's paper, the Washington Post), the media are intentionally polarizing and misleading the public because of their agenda.

But then that's probably hard to see when you're on the inside of the hate-Trump bubble, as Samuelson is, rather than watching it from the outside in disbelief.

The headline from Robert J. Samuelson in the WaPo is "Will the economy save Trump?"

I believe that Samuelson is confused.  The headline should be "Thank God for the Trump Economy."

Samuelson obviously recognizes that the economy is good:

People still tend to credit or blame the sitting president for the economy's performance.

For Trump, that's fabulous news.  The economy is thriving, and most mainstream analysts believe [that] it will stay that way through the year.  An improving global economy compounds the effect.

Consider the forecast from IHS Markit, a consulting firm.  It expects U.S. economic growth of 2.6 percent in 2018, better than the 2.3 percent in 2017 and much better than the 1.5 percent in 2016.  The unemployment rate, now 4.1 percent, will drop below 4 percent.  But inflation won't worsen.  For 2018, consumer prices are expected to increase 1.3 percent, down from 2017's 2.1 percent. 

Then Samuelson is confused because he has no idea why the public doesn't recognize that the economy is good and wonders why polarization has intensified.  

What's striking about the current situation is the huge disconnect between what's happening in the economy and what's happening in politics.  Politics is unstable and chaotic.  Polarization has intensified, and Trump has corrupted political debate with his constant, often untrue tweets.  Meanwhile, economic confidence is strong, and the stock market acts as if it has not a worry in the world.

To some extent, the contradictions can be reconciled by Trump's pro-business tax and regulatory policies.  But the gap is too wide for this to be a fully adequate explanation.

This shows that Samuelson either doesn't read or can't comprehend that when 95% of the articles on Trump are negative, no matter what he does (especially in Samuleson's paper, the Washington Post), the media are intentionally polarizing and misleading the public because of their agenda.

But then that's probably hard to see when you're on the inside of the hate-Trump bubble, as Samuelson is, rather than watching it from the outside in disbelief.