How Trump will 'work with' Congress

Over this weekend, as the Electoral College heads toward its decision on Monday, there are numerous articles on the Web saying that Trump is going to find Washington difficult. That it is not like the campaign. That he will have to deal with a hostile Congress – both houses, and both parties. That he does not have a strong base with the Republicans in Congress. There may even be a strategy afoot to impeach him not long into his term, as there are enough votes on both sides of the aisle to do it

Hmmm…

President-elect Trump’s policies, to the extent he needs Congressional support or approval – and he will on most of them – are not going to be decided “in Committee” or in “intense backdoor negotiations,” or to accommodate some recalcitrant power-broker.

Trump’s policies are going to be decided in public. Trump is like the American Army entering Iraq. The defenders have no idea what is happening.

In Europe -- the European Theater of Operations -- in World War II individual soldiers were frequently interviewed spontaneously for all the reasons you can imagine. The reporter was looking for color. When the soldier was asked what unit was in, he usually gave his regiment, sometimes his division. But if he was in the Third Army, his response would be “I’m with Patton.”

When someone looks to be standing in his way, we are going to get some variant of Trump announcing -- and then holding one of his rallies in the miscreant’s hometown, featuring a primary opponent, if any. The theme of Trump’s speech will be a review of what he wants for America; how he and the people at the rally are going to Make America Great Again. But there is just one problem. The fellow in question – congressman or senator – is standing in the road, is trying to stop the rebirth of America’s greatness and, for America to be back, the person in question has to be gone – whether that means a recall, or refers to the next election.

Trump only has to do this a few times, probably only once, maybe even only threaten to do it once, to bring everybody to heel. And you know the worst thing for the oppo? This is not a trial for Trump. He loves doing it! By this time next year, one year into Trump’s term and the starting gun for the 2018 election, there will be reporters stopping Congresspeople for spontaneous interviews.

“Where are you on this issue, Congressman (of either party)?”

“I’m with Trump.”

Over this weekend, as the Electoral College heads toward its decision on Monday, there are numerous articles on the Web saying that Trump is going to find Washington difficult. That it is not like the campaign. That he will have to deal with a hostile Congress – both houses, and both parties. That he does not have a strong base with the Republicans in Congress. There may even be a strategy afoot to impeach him not long into his term, as there are enough votes on both sides of the aisle to do it

Hmmm…

President-elect Trump’s policies, to the extent he needs Congressional support or approval – and he will on most of them – are not going to be decided “in Committee” or in “intense backdoor negotiations,” or to accommodate some recalcitrant power-broker.

Trump’s policies are going to be decided in public. Trump is like the American Army entering Iraq. The defenders have no idea what is happening.

In Europe -- the European Theater of Operations -- in World War II individual soldiers were frequently interviewed spontaneously for all the reasons you can imagine. The reporter was looking for color. When the soldier was asked what unit was in, he usually gave his regiment, sometimes his division. But if he was in the Third Army, his response would be “I’m with Patton.”

When someone looks to be standing in his way, we are going to get some variant of Trump announcing -- and then holding one of his rallies in the miscreant’s hometown, featuring a primary opponent, if any. The theme of Trump’s speech will be a review of what he wants for America; how he and the people at the rally are going to Make America Great Again. But there is just one problem. The fellow in question – congressman or senator – is standing in the road, is trying to stop the rebirth of America’s greatness and, for America to be back, the person in question has to be gone – whether that means a recall, or refers to the next election.

Trump only has to do this a few times, probably only once, maybe even only threaten to do it once, to bring everybody to heel. And you know the worst thing for the oppo? This is not a trial for Trump. He loves doing it! By this time next year, one year into Trump’s term and the starting gun for the 2018 election, there will be reporters stopping Congresspeople for spontaneous interviews.

“Where are you on this issue, Congressman (of either party)?”

“I’m with Trump.”