The progressive way of growing the economy

Something overlooked in the immigration debate is that the huge numbers of illegal immigrants allowed into the country over the years are very good for business.  Rather than cutting taxes and regulations, the progressive solution is to simply import more customers. 

Businesses are in the business of being profitable, and most of that comes from increasing the number of people using their products and services.  This goes a long way in explaining why the Walmarts, Starbuckses, and Targets of the world are so liberal in their public profiles.  Immigrants become eligible for food stamps either when they have children in the United States or through the widespread use of forged documents, which no one seems to care or do anything about.  This allows them to use their EBT cards to buy groceries from the local Walmart or other goods from Target and so on.  Why in the world would corporate America have a problem with these scenarios? Money is money, and they're all too happy to accept it no matter what its origin.  The same can be said of people already on welfare.  This explains why business is not necessarily opposed to the entitlement state. 

It's been pointed out for many years that businesses like the open border policy because it provides a steady stream of cheap labor, but it also happens to expand their customer base in a big way.  The U.S. Chamber of Commerce has come out against Trump, so besides the low-wage labor the open borders policy offers, why wouldn't they support policies that are going to increase the numbers of people buying their products and services as well as providing cheap labor they need?  It also explains why so many on Wall Street support Hillary and have been liberal Democrats for decades.  It is rarely pointed out either that Hillary once sat on the corporate board of directors for Walmart.  That speaks volumes in and of itself.

What's good for big business is good for the stock market and for big banks.  They get huge fees for advising on mergers and acquisitions and the continuous stream of big-time income from underwriting corporate debt in the form of bond offerings.  The relationship of business and government is indeed an incestuous one.

Lloyd Blankfein, the CEO of the Goldman Sachs, the largest investment bank in world, ordered his top executives not to donate to Trump (but they are allowed to give to Hillary).  Now, why would that be?  Don't expect any intrepid reporters to connect the dots.

Big business and big banks, therefore, are all in with the progressive way of growing the economy.  They know they'll be punching bags every election cycle, but the dirty little secret is that they don't care, because they also know that the Democrats really don't mean what they're saying.

Something overlooked in the immigration debate is that the huge numbers of illegal immigrants allowed into the country over the years are very good for business.  Rather than cutting taxes and regulations, the progressive solution is to simply import more customers. 

Businesses are in the business of being profitable, and most of that comes from increasing the number of people using their products and services.  This goes a long way in explaining why the Walmarts, Starbuckses, and Targets of the world are so liberal in their public profiles.  Immigrants become eligible for food stamps either when they have children in the United States or through the widespread use of forged documents, which no one seems to care or do anything about.  This allows them to use their EBT cards to buy groceries from the local Walmart or other goods from Target and so on.  Why in the world would corporate America have a problem with these scenarios? Money is money, and they're all too happy to accept it no matter what its origin.  The same can be said of people already on welfare.  This explains why business is not necessarily opposed to the entitlement state. 

It's been pointed out for many years that businesses like the open border policy because it provides a steady stream of cheap labor, but it also happens to expand their customer base in a big way.  The U.S. Chamber of Commerce has come out against Trump, so besides the low-wage labor the open borders policy offers, why wouldn't they support policies that are going to increase the numbers of people buying their products and services as well as providing cheap labor they need?  It also explains why so many on Wall Street support Hillary and have been liberal Democrats for decades.  It is rarely pointed out either that Hillary once sat on the corporate board of directors for Walmart.  That speaks volumes in and of itself.

What's good for big business is good for the stock market and for big banks.  They get huge fees for advising on mergers and acquisitions and the continuous stream of big-time income from underwriting corporate debt in the form of bond offerings.  The relationship of business and government is indeed an incestuous one.

Lloyd Blankfein, the CEO of the Goldman Sachs, the largest investment bank in world, ordered his top executives not to donate to Trump (but they are allowed to give to Hillary).  Now, why would that be?  Don't expect any intrepid reporters to connect the dots.

Big business and big banks, therefore, are all in with the progressive way of growing the economy.  They know they'll be punching bags every election cycle, but the dirty little secret is that they don't care, because they also know that the Democrats really don't mean what they're saying.