Maybe it's time to change the name

Everything has a name – a brand, if you will  and many people, unhappy people, politically motivated people want to change those names.  The list is endless, so I don’t think examples are necessary, but sports teams come immediately to mind.  We know that names affect the way people feel.  The media and the DNC know that.  And we know that feelings have nothing to do with facts and even less to do with thinking.

Every year, when the month of August and the anniversary of Hiroshima and Nagasaki come along, there is an endless display of chest-thumping and mea culpas, and President Obama really, really...really gets into that.  But interestingly enough, certain things, certain names, remain inexplicably the same, and they are “Little Boy” and “Fat Man.”  Rather inoffensive names, but the former was the first uranium bomb and the latter a plutonium bomb, and nothing changed what happened or the result, which was the ending of the war in the Pacific.  But nuclear weapons in the wrong hands (think, oh, North Korea or possibly Iran) kill innocent people, too, not just citizens of a warrior-nation (i.e. Imperial Japan).

Now, some may say it’s just semantics, but why can’t the thinking people change the name of the AR-15 to something like the Defender Number One?  Some people might start feeling better, and maybe when they’re feeling better, we can help them start thinking again.

Everything has a name – a brand, if you will  and many people, unhappy people, politically motivated people want to change those names.  The list is endless, so I don’t think examples are necessary, but sports teams come immediately to mind.  We know that names affect the way people feel.  The media and the DNC know that.  And we know that feelings have nothing to do with facts and even less to do with thinking.

Every year, when the month of August and the anniversary of Hiroshima and Nagasaki come along, there is an endless display of chest-thumping and mea culpas, and President Obama really, really...really gets into that.  But interestingly enough, certain things, certain names, remain inexplicably the same, and they are “Little Boy” and “Fat Man.”  Rather inoffensive names, but the former was the first uranium bomb and the latter a plutonium bomb, and nothing changed what happened or the result, which was the ending of the war in the Pacific.  But nuclear weapons in the wrong hands (think, oh, North Korea or possibly Iran) kill innocent people, too, not just citizens of a warrior-nation (i.e. Imperial Japan).

Now, some may say it’s just semantics, but why can’t the thinking people change the name of the AR-15 to something like the Defender Number One?  Some people might start feeling better, and maybe when they’re feeling better, we can help them start thinking again.