A shared American experience: Super Bowl

Silly me.  I thought I could quickly drive to my local supermarket for non-breaded hot and spicy chicken wings an hour before the start of the Super Bowl.  They were sold out and frantically in the process of cooking more.  Unless I had pre-ordered, it would be at least an hour before they could fill my order.  Every checkout line was full.  Were the majority of patrons last-minute Super Bowl shoppers like me?

I thought, I bet similar scenarios are happening across America: mega-millions preparing to watch the Super Bowl.  Imagine all the businesses that profit from the Super Bowl.

One of the few people who could care less about the game is my wife Mary.  She thoroughly enjoyed watching the “Puppy Bowl.”

Having to settle for bar-b-que spareribs, I watched the game alone on my 60-inch flat-screen TV.  It was fun texting my brothers, my daughter, and a few friends about the game, before, during, and after.

A term frequently used in politics is “too smart by half.”  It usually refers to someone trying to be the smartest person in the room.  Clearly, Seattle lost the Super Bowl because someone on their team (coach, offensive coordinator, or quarterback) tried to be too smart by half; deciding to throw a pass on the one-yard line rather than doing what every viewer knew was the correct play – handing the ball to Marshawn Lynch.  What a shocking finish.  It was a great game.

It was fun being a part of a uniquely American shared experience, watching and allowing myself to be slightly emotionally invested in the Super Bowl.

Now back to the real world: politically stopping Obama.

Silly me.  I thought I could quickly drive to my local supermarket for non-breaded hot and spicy chicken wings an hour before the start of the Super Bowl.  They were sold out and frantically in the process of cooking more.  Unless I had pre-ordered, it would be at least an hour before they could fill my order.  Every checkout line was full.  Were the majority of patrons last-minute Super Bowl shoppers like me?

I thought, I bet similar scenarios are happening across America: mega-millions preparing to watch the Super Bowl.  Imagine all the businesses that profit from the Super Bowl.

One of the few people who could care less about the game is my wife Mary.  She thoroughly enjoyed watching the “Puppy Bowl.”

Having to settle for bar-b-que spareribs, I watched the game alone on my 60-inch flat-screen TV.  It was fun texting my brothers, my daughter, and a few friends about the game, before, during, and after.

A term frequently used in politics is “too smart by half.”  It usually refers to someone trying to be the smartest person in the room.  Clearly, Seattle lost the Super Bowl because someone on their team (coach, offensive coordinator, or quarterback) tried to be too smart by half; deciding to throw a pass on the one-yard line rather than doing what every viewer knew was the correct play – handing the ball to Marshawn Lynch.  What a shocking finish.  It was a great game.

It was fun being a part of a uniquely American shared experience, watching and allowing myself to be slightly emotionally invested in the Super Bowl.

Now back to the real world: politically stopping Obama.