Dr. Huxtable and Mr. Hyde

It was not a good week for Bill Cosby.  Hundreds of thousands people who didn’t know what a “meme” was and knew nothing about the comedian’s sexual exploits have been enlightened. 

At last count, thirteen women have come forward to testify that they were raped by Cosby.  Most of them had been drugged.  Dr. Cliff Huxtable, played by Cosby for eight years on The Cosby Show, was an OB/GYN.  Cosby wanted the show to mirror his own life:  he insisted on adding a fifth Huxtable child because he himself had five children.  But in real life, Dr. Cliff practiced without the surgical gloves and without a license, and his victims hadn’t come to him with any complaints, except for stars in their eyes. 

The first full-length biography of Cosby was published earlier this year, with great fanfare, and no mention of his rapes.  The biography will be remaindered in a bippidity bop.  Cosby also has a new show coming out on NBC next year.  This will be cancelled in a dippidity doo.  Sponsors will run for cover.  Co-written by the writer of Shameless, the sit-com, according to NBC’s Entertainment President, features Cosby “as the patriarch of the family, dispensing his classic wisdom on relationships and parenthood, with three daughters, husbands and grandchildren.”

The pity of Cosby’s fall is that the wisdom he dispensed was classic.  For decades he urged African-Americans to be responsible, practice self-restraint and teach this to their children, and not to blame their problems on whites.  This, of course, earned him the undying enmity of the multiculturati.  It’s no coincidence (as their Marxist instructors used to say) that it was the Washington Post that ran a searing “j’accuse” op-ed by one of his victims.

 The Washpo, along with the New York Times, NBC, and ABC, meanwhile refuse to run a story that broke on the same day as the Cosby memes, the Jonathan Gruber videos—trusting, as always, that their readers and viewers are not familiar with the internet.  Drugging and raping 13 women is a scandal; drugging and raping 320 million Americans is politics.

Everyone wanted to believe in the Huxtables, so smart, so funny, so charming, so perfectly upper-middle-class white.  Something like the Obama who was peddled to us in 2008.  What seems too good to be true seldom is, as investors always learn one way or another.

It was not a good week for Bill Cosby.  Hundreds of thousands people who didn’t know what a “meme” was and knew nothing about the comedian’s sexual exploits have been enlightened. 

At last count, thirteen women have come forward to testify that they were raped by Cosby.  Most of them had been drugged.  Dr. Cliff Huxtable, played by Cosby for eight years on The Cosby Show, was an OB/GYN.  Cosby wanted the show to mirror his own life:  he insisted on adding a fifth Huxtable child because he himself had five children.  But in real life, Dr. Cliff practiced without the surgical gloves and without a license, and his victims hadn’t come to him with any complaints, except for stars in their eyes. 

The first full-length biography of Cosby was published earlier this year, with great fanfare, and no mention of his rapes.  The biography will be remaindered in a bippidity bop.  Cosby also has a new show coming out on NBC next year.  This will be cancelled in a dippidity doo.  Sponsors will run for cover.  Co-written by the writer of Shameless, the sit-com, according to NBC’s Entertainment President, features Cosby “as the patriarch of the family, dispensing his classic wisdom on relationships and parenthood, with three daughters, husbands and grandchildren.”

The pity of Cosby’s fall is that the wisdom he dispensed was classic.  For decades he urged African-Americans to be responsible, practice self-restraint and teach this to their children, and not to blame their problems on whites.  This, of course, earned him the undying enmity of the multiculturati.  It’s no coincidence (as their Marxist instructors used to say) that it was the Washington Post that ran a searing “j’accuse” op-ed by one of his victims.

 The Washpo, along with the New York Times, NBC, and ABC, meanwhile refuse to run a story that broke on the same day as the Cosby memes, the Jonathan Gruber videos—trusting, as always, that their readers and viewers are not familiar with the internet.  Drugging and raping 13 women is a scandal; drugging and raping 320 million Americans is politics.

Everyone wanted to believe in the Huxtables, so smart, so funny, so charming, so perfectly upper-middle-class white.  Something like the Obama who was peddled to us in 2008.  What seems too good to be true seldom is, as investors always learn one way or another.