How a Post–Civil War Supreme Court Decision Dismantles Sanctuary Cities

Introduction Shortly after the Civil War and the passage of the 14th Amendment, the US Supreme Court decided the Slaughter-House cases.  Historically, many people have looked at these decisions as severely limiting the ability of the federal government and federal courts from interfering with state government functions by using the Privileges and Immunities clause of the 14th Amendment.  Regardless of your position on that debate, this article looks at how the decision by Justice Miller in 1873 actually provides a strong precedent for using the Privileges and Immunities clause of the 14th Amendment against all sanctuary states, counties, and cities. Privileges and Immunities of all United States citizens In the Slaughter-House decision, Justice Miller writes : Having shown that the privileges and immunities relied on in the argument are those which belong to citizens of the States as such, and that they are left to the State governments for security and...(Read Full Article)
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