Can you find the 'racist lesson' in this image?

Who would have thought that a Kellogg's Corn Pops box would contain a racist lesson for kids?

Well, the answer to that question is a Marvel Comics writer who was outraged that Kellogg's would be so blatantly racist in designing its cereal boxes.

Before reading the description below, see if you can find the "racist" image kids will see when they eat their breakfast in the morning.

Washington Times:

A complaint to Kellogg's this week that its Corn Pops box art is teaching children to be racist received a prompt apology and a vow to immediately implement changes.

A writer for Marvel Comics took to Twitter on Wednesday to ask why a Corn Pops scene included a brown anthropomorphic kernel performing janitorial duties among a group of others having fun. The company responded within hours with a promise to rectify the situation.

"Hey @KelloggsUS why is literally the only brown corn pop on the whole cereal box the janitor?" said Saladin Ahmed, who writes "Black Bolt" for Marvel. "This is teaching kids racism." Ahmed then added, "Yes it's a tiny thing, but when you see your kid staring at this over breakfast and realize millions of other kids are doing the same…"

hey @KelloggsUS why is literally the only brown corn pop on the whole cereal box the janitor? this is teaching kids racism. pic.twitter.com/Nh7M7IFawW

— Saladin Ahmed (@saladinahmed) October 24, 2017

Either Kellogg's is a blatantly racist company or...

...or the writer is full of crap.

Kellogg's, playing the racialist game, apologized profusely and promised to change the box design.

"Kellogg is committed to diversity & inclusion. We did not intend to offend – we apologize. The artwork is updated & will be in stores soon," the Kellogg account tweeted.

An expanded statement was released to USA Today shortly afterward.

"Kellogg Company has respect for all people, and our commitment to diversity and inclusion has long been a top priority," the company said. "We take feedback very seriously, and it was never our intention to offend anyone. We apologize sincerely. The package artwork has been updated and will begin to appear on store shelves soon as it flows through distribution."

I don't know what's worse: a hysterical writer who sees racists under his bed or an old-line American company like Kellogg's groveling before this politically correct assault.

Obviously, you can find "racism" in anything you look at – if you look hard enough.  Here's Leonardo da Vinci's "Last Supper."  Can you spot the racist aspect to this image?

I claim that the pigmentation of Jesus is darker than the other images, and the three apostles on the far right aren't paying any attention to him, and that is deliberate racism.  It is clearly racist to ignore a person of color.

See how easy it is?

Mr. Ahmed failed to observe that the other kernels of corn are not white, but light brown.  I suggest that his complaint is racist against brown people like Hispanics.  That's an observation with at least as much legitimacy as the writer's nonsensical notion.

Who would have thought that a Kellogg's Corn Pops box would contain a racist lesson for kids?

Well, the answer to that question is a Marvel Comics writer who was outraged that Kellogg's would be so blatantly racist in designing its cereal boxes.

Before reading the description below, see if you can find the "racist" image kids will see when they eat their breakfast in the morning.

Washington Times:

A complaint to Kellogg's this week that its Corn Pops box art is teaching children to be racist received a prompt apology and a vow to immediately implement changes.

A writer for Marvel Comics took to Twitter on Wednesday to ask why a Corn Pops scene included a brown anthropomorphic kernel performing janitorial duties among a group of others having fun. The company responded within hours with a promise to rectify the situation.

"Hey @KelloggsUS why is literally the only brown corn pop on the whole cereal box the janitor?" said Saladin Ahmed, who writes "Black Bolt" for Marvel. "This is teaching kids racism." Ahmed then added, "Yes it's a tiny thing, but when you see your kid staring at this over breakfast and realize millions of other kids are doing the same…"

hey @KelloggsUS why is literally the only brown corn pop on the whole cereal box the janitor? this is teaching kids racism. pic.twitter.com/Nh7M7IFawW

— Saladin Ahmed (@saladinahmed) October 24, 2017

Either Kellogg's is a blatantly racist company or...

...or the writer is full of crap.

Kellogg's, playing the racialist game, apologized profusely and promised to change the box design.

"Kellogg is committed to diversity & inclusion. We did not intend to offend – we apologize. The artwork is updated & will be in stores soon," the Kellogg account tweeted.

An expanded statement was released to USA Today shortly afterward.

"Kellogg Company has respect for all people, and our commitment to diversity and inclusion has long been a top priority," the company said. "We take feedback very seriously, and it was never our intention to offend anyone. We apologize sincerely. The package artwork has been updated and will begin to appear on store shelves soon as it flows through distribution."

I don't know what's worse: a hysterical writer who sees racists under his bed or an old-line American company like Kellogg's groveling before this politically correct assault.

Obviously, you can find "racism" in anything you look at – if you look hard enough.  Here's Leonardo da Vinci's "Last Supper."  Can you spot the racist aspect to this image?

I claim that the pigmentation of Jesus is darker than the other images, and the three apostles on the far right aren't paying any attention to him, and that is deliberate racism.  It is clearly racist to ignore a person of color.

See how easy it is?

Mr. Ahmed failed to observe that the other kernels of corn are not white, but light brown.  I suggest that his complaint is racist against brown people like Hispanics.  That's an observation with at least as much legitimacy as the writer's nonsensical notion.

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