Houston's 'Cajun Navy,' brilliantly profiled

The most remarkable fact about the horrible events in Texas was the minimal loss of life and of storm-related injuries.  Much credit goes to the long advance warning, early and near total evacuations of "Ground Zero" residents, other preparations, and the fact that Hurricane Harvey's landfall was at a sparsely populated section of the coast.

For all of that, we must be most grateful.

The biggest lesson that must be reinforced is "stay out of your car," since many of the deaths were related to drownings associated with vehicle travel.

The most engrossing story is that of the "Cajun Navy."

We'll never know how many lives were saved by the Cajun Navy (and other rescuers) in personal watercraft, but it is indisputable that great human suffering was mitigated by the evacuation of hundreds (probably thousands) of people by this nebulous coterie of selfless volunteers hauling them from danger and discomfort to safety.

Sally Jenkins has written a delightful and informative piece about the members of that group and its origin:

At a time such as this, you want the guys who can still thread a line when their hands are wet and cold[.] ... Spending hours in monsoon rains doesn't bother them, because they know ducks don't just show up on a plate, and they've learned what most of us haven't, that dry comfort is not the only thing worth seeking.

Aside from demonstrating that she has forgotten more about fishing and boating that you and I will ever know or learn, Ms. Jenkins gets the minds of and the origins of the group:

This Cajun Navy is a nebulous, informal thing. It has no real corps or officers ... [and it began] in the Lafayette-Libreville area during Katrina[.]

If you have time to read nothing else today, do treat yourself to some extraordinary writing about an extraordinary group of guys who "don't care if they're wet, 'or how hot you are, or how bad you smell.'"

Her father must be smiling.

Hat tip: Paul Mirengoff

The author is retired, his profile may be found on LinkedIn, and he usually responds to emails sent to bilschan@hotmail.com.

The most remarkable fact about the horrible events in Texas was the minimal loss of life and of storm-related injuries.  Much credit goes to the long advance warning, early and near total evacuations of "Ground Zero" residents, other preparations, and the fact that Hurricane Harvey's landfall was at a sparsely populated section of the coast.

For all of that, we must be most grateful.

The biggest lesson that must be reinforced is "stay out of your car," since many of the deaths were related to drownings associated with vehicle travel.

The most engrossing story is that of the "Cajun Navy."

We'll never know how many lives were saved by the Cajun Navy (and other rescuers) in personal watercraft, but it is indisputable that great human suffering was mitigated by the evacuation of hundreds (probably thousands) of people by this nebulous coterie of selfless volunteers hauling them from danger and discomfort to safety.

Sally Jenkins has written a delightful and informative piece about the members of that group and its origin:

At a time such as this, you want the guys who can still thread a line when their hands are wet and cold[.] ... Spending hours in monsoon rains doesn't bother them, because they know ducks don't just show up on a plate, and they've learned what most of us haven't, that dry comfort is not the only thing worth seeking.

Aside from demonstrating that she has forgotten more about fishing and boating that you and I will ever know or learn, Ms. Jenkins gets the minds of and the origins of the group:

This Cajun Navy is a nebulous, informal thing. It has no real corps or officers ... [and it began] in the Lafayette-Libreville area during Katrina[.]

If you have time to read nothing else today, do treat yourself to some extraordinary writing about an extraordinary group of guys who "don't care if they're wet, 'or how hot you are, or how bad you smell.'"

Her father must be smiling.

Hat tip: Paul Mirengoff

The author is retired, his profile may be found on LinkedIn, and he usually responds to emails sent to bilschan@hotmail.com.

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