Poll: Voters say ideal candidate would change Obama's policies

Who would be the ideal candidate that voters want to see run for president? A new CNN/ORC poll reveals some surprising results. At bottom, a majority of voters want to see a "non-Obama" run and win.

A new CNN/ORC poll finds most Americans say they would like a candidate who's a seasoned political leader, someone with an executive background, and someone who's willing to change Barack Obama's policies.

Rather than assessing the traits of individual candidates, the poll asked respondents to think about their perfect candidate and choose between two statements relating to several different traits often found in presidential candidates.

Would the perfect successor to Obama be someone with ideological purity or someone who had a great chance at winning? Someone who has had economic success or someone who's never been wealthy? Someone who relies on their religious views to guide policy or someone who believes religion should have no place in government?

Three statements generated wide-reaching support. Fifty-nine percent of Americans say they'd like a candidate who has been in the public eye as a political leader for many years over one who's new to the political scene. Further, 59% say they prefer a candidate with executive experience over one who's worked as a legislator, and 57% say their perfect Obama successor would change most of the policies enacted by Obama's administration.

A long history in the political limelight is appealing to a broad swath of Americans, with majorities across age, race and education lines saying they prefer someone who's been in the public eye as a political leader for many years.

There is a partisan tinge to the results of this question, however, with Democrats, who will choose from a field, in which, the leading contender for their party's presidential nomination has decades in the public eye, more apt to prefer a seasoned leader (77%) than Republicans (51%). On the GOP side, 46% say they would rather see someone who is new to the political scene take the White House in 2016, and their party's field includes several contenders who fit that bill.

Overall, 57% say their perfect Obama successor would change most of the policies of the Obama administration, while 41% prefer that the next president continue most of his policies. Republicans are near unanimous in their search for a change in most of Obama's policies, 94% want that. Among Democrats, 22% are looking for changes, 77% would prefer Obama's policies to remain in place.

Even with the partisan divide, a majority of independents would also like to see an un-Obama president. Of course, this plays right into the GOP wheelhouse because their candidate will almost certainly have more experience than Obama had when he ran for president. And every potential Republican candidate to date has promised to overturn most of Obama's policies.

The name recognition issue is the only thing that plays well for Democrats. But what will Hillary have to say once voters get by the idea that she would be the first woman president? Once the spotlight falls on her, she is liable to be struck dumb because 1) she doesn't have much of a record; and 2) she hasn't had a new idea in 20 years. In the end, that name recognition may be her undoing as people will be expecting a lot more than she can possibly give them.

Who would be the ideal candidate that voters want to see run for president? A new CNN/ORC poll reveals some surprising results. At bottom, a majority of voters want to see a "non-Obama" run and win.

A new CNN/ORC poll finds most Americans say they would like a candidate who's a seasoned political leader, someone with an executive background, and someone who's willing to change Barack Obama's policies.

Rather than assessing the traits of individual candidates, the poll asked respondents to think about their perfect candidate and choose between two statements relating to several different traits often found in presidential candidates.

Would the perfect successor to Obama be someone with ideological purity or someone who had a great chance at winning? Someone who has had economic success or someone who's never been wealthy? Someone who relies on their religious views to guide policy or someone who believes religion should have no place in government?

Three statements generated wide-reaching support. Fifty-nine percent of Americans say they'd like a candidate who has been in the public eye as a political leader for many years over one who's new to the political scene. Further, 59% say they prefer a candidate with executive experience over one who's worked as a legislator, and 57% say their perfect Obama successor would change most of the policies enacted by Obama's administration.

A long history in the political limelight is appealing to a broad swath of Americans, with majorities across age, race and education lines saying they prefer someone who's been in the public eye as a political leader for many years.

There is a partisan tinge to the results of this question, however, with Democrats, who will choose from a field, in which, the leading contender for their party's presidential nomination has decades in the public eye, more apt to prefer a seasoned leader (77%) than Republicans (51%). On the GOP side, 46% say they would rather see someone who is new to the political scene take the White House in 2016, and their party's field includes several contenders who fit that bill.

Overall, 57% say their perfect Obama successor would change most of the policies of the Obama administration, while 41% prefer that the next president continue most of his policies. Republicans are near unanimous in their search for a change in most of Obama's policies, 94% want that. Among Democrats, 22% are looking for changes, 77% would prefer Obama's policies to remain in place.

Even with the partisan divide, a majority of independents would also like to see an un-Obama president. Of course, this plays right into the GOP wheelhouse because their candidate will almost certainly have more experience than Obama had when he ran for president. And every potential Republican candidate to date has promised to overturn most of Obama's policies.

The name recognition issue is the only thing that plays well for Democrats. But what will Hillary have to say once voters get by the idea that she would be the first woman president? Once the spotlight falls on her, she is liable to be struck dumb because 1) she doesn't have much of a record; and 2) she hasn't had a new idea in 20 years. In the end, that name recognition may be her undoing as people will be expecting a lot more than she can possibly give them.