Dartmouth now bans white people from using the word 'fiesta'

The race to the bottom for most obsessively politically-correct Ivy League campus has a new front-runner. Dartmouth, once known as the most free-spirited home of the “Dartmouth animal” in the 1960s, when it was all-male, has seized the lead. Capitalism is Freedom reports:

…the fracas is over a fundraiser for cardiac care that the Phi Delta Alpha fraternity and the Alpha Phi sorority had planned to jointly sponsor, reports Campus Reform.

Problems arose because a single student, junior Daniela Hernandez, was offended by the party’s theme of “Phiesta.”

As a result, the soiree, which was scheduled for Saturday, has been canceled by the presidents of the respective Greek organizations.

Had the party happened, it would have included a live band as well as virgin piña coladas and strawberry daiquiris. There would also have been burritos, chips and salsa, and guacamole.

The cash raised at the event would have gone to benefit cardiac treatments.

However, Hernandez’s deep offense about racial insensitivity was enough to call it off.

The self-proclaimed “Mexican-born, United-States-raised, first-generation woman of color” declared in an angry email that “there are various problematic structures and ideologies regarding a Cinco de Mayo-inspired event,” according to Campus Reform.

She decreed her distaste for “the Americanization of Cinco de Mayo and its construction as a drinking holiday in the United States, cultural appropriation and the inappropriate usage of cultural clothing, and the exploitation of groups of people and cultures for the sake of business opportunities”—and, apparently, charity opportunities.

Ms. Hernandez may be unaware, despite her Mexican birth, that Cinco de Mayo is not a national holiday in Mexico. It is, in fact, a mostly American invention as a day to celebrate, part of our national culture of fixing upon ethnic occasions as an excuse for eating and drinking. While St. Patrick’s Day is an honest-to-goodness Irish holiday, Columbus Day goes unobserved in Italy, and I don’t know the status of “Puerto Rico Day” on that island, but in New York City it provides an excuse for a parade and bacchanalia. And what is wrong with Americans celebrating our varied ethnicities with a chance to loosen up? Ms. Hernandez seems to think “privilege” means you can’t do such things (doesn’t that make “privileged” mean “un-privileged”?):

“It was sadly unsurprising that a culturally-themed party was seen as a casual venture for such a privileged institution such as Dartmouth,” Hernandez proclaimed.

Wait a minute! With that kind of power, doesn't Ms. Hernandez stand as the "privileged" one?

At today’s Dartmouth, none dare stand up to this nonsense:

Phi Delt president Taylor Catchcart explained why the Greek organizations folded.

“We felt that the possibility of offending even one member of the Dartmouth community was not worth the potential benefits of having the fundraiser,” he said.

Outrage and melanin (or homosexuality) are now the prerequisites for social power.

The race to the bottom for most obsessively politically-correct Ivy League campus has a new front-runner. Dartmouth, once known as the most free-spirited home of the “Dartmouth animal” in the 1960s, when it was all-male, has seized the lead. Capitalism is Freedom reports:

…the fracas is over a fundraiser for cardiac care that the Phi Delta Alpha fraternity and the Alpha Phi sorority had planned to jointly sponsor, reports Campus Reform.

Problems arose because a single student, junior Daniela Hernandez, was offended by the party’s theme of “Phiesta.”

As a result, the soiree, which was scheduled for Saturday, has been canceled by the presidents of the respective Greek organizations.

Had the party happened, it would have included a live band as well as virgin piña coladas and strawberry daiquiris. There would also have been burritos, chips and salsa, and guacamole.

The cash raised at the event would have gone to benefit cardiac treatments.

However, Hernandez’s deep offense about racial insensitivity was enough to call it off.

The self-proclaimed “Mexican-born, United-States-raised, first-generation woman of color” declared in an angry email that “there are various problematic structures and ideologies regarding a Cinco de Mayo-inspired event,” according to Campus Reform.

She decreed her distaste for “the Americanization of Cinco de Mayo and its construction as a drinking holiday in the United States, cultural appropriation and the inappropriate usage of cultural clothing, and the exploitation of groups of people and cultures for the sake of business opportunities”—and, apparently, charity opportunities.

Ms. Hernandez may be unaware, despite her Mexican birth, that Cinco de Mayo is not a national holiday in Mexico. It is, in fact, a mostly American invention as a day to celebrate, part of our national culture of fixing upon ethnic occasions as an excuse for eating and drinking. While St. Patrick’s Day is an honest-to-goodness Irish holiday, Columbus Day goes unobserved in Italy, and I don’t know the status of “Puerto Rico Day” on that island, but in New York City it provides an excuse for a parade and bacchanalia. And what is wrong with Americans celebrating our varied ethnicities with a chance to loosen up? Ms. Hernandez seems to think “privilege” means you can’t do such things (doesn’t that make “privileged” mean “un-privileged”?):

“It was sadly unsurprising that a culturally-themed party was seen as a casual venture for such a privileged institution such as Dartmouth,” Hernandez proclaimed.

Wait a minute! With that kind of power, doesn't Ms. Hernandez stand as the "privileged" one?

At today’s Dartmouth, none dare stand up to this nonsense:

Phi Delt president Taylor Catchcart explained why the Greek organizations folded.

“We felt that the possibility of offending even one member of the Dartmouth community was not worth the potential benefits of having the fundraiser,” he said.

Outrage and melanin (or homosexuality) are now the prerequisites for social power.

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