'Fast and Furious' -- Paul Walker or Gun Walker?

Jeannie DeAngelis
Paul Walker, the star of several action films that feature street racing and car heists, tragically lost his life recently after a charity event in Santa Clarita, California. Walker was in the passenger seat of his friend Roger Rodas's red Porsche when the speeding vehicle crashed into a tree and burst into flames, killing both men.

Just 40 years old, Walker played a huge part in Universal's biggest movie franchise of all time. As of October of this year, The Fast and the Furious had earned $2,380,084,668 on the original, six sequels, two related short films, plus a video game series. Fast and Furious 7 is currently in production.

Now, fans of the series and fans of Paul Walker are shocked and grief-stricken over the star's untimely death. Yet sadly, there is an even greater tragedy revealed in the wake of Walker's demise.

Judging from public reaction, it seems as if many Americans know more about the Fast and Furious actor than the two federal agents and hundreds of innocent Mexicans murdered with "Fast and Furious" guns supplied to drug gangs by an ATF/US government gun-running operation.

The less glamorous "Fast and Furious" operation didn't have fast cars or hot blue-eyed movie stars. Instead, it was a harebrained production that was purportedly implemented as an effort to track illegal guns from the U.S. to Mexico whose cast of characters included shady gun walkers, gangs, and drug cartels.

The Obama Administration-approved, straw-purchased 2,000-gun "Fast and Furious" cache included AK-47 semi-automatic and .50 caliber rifles. Two of those weapons were responsible for the deaths of Border agent Brian Terry, who, like Paul Walker, was just 40 years old when he died, and ICE agent Jaime Zapata, who was 35 years old when ambushed and shot dead in a separate incident.

What's not surprising is that despite the large number of casualties that resulted from the botched operation, the U.S. government has yet to track down most of the missing guns.

Making a comparison between the two "Fast and Furious" stories is certainly not to minimize the tragic, untimely death of a young actor, or to politicize an unfortunate accident. Rather, it's an attempt to point out that finding ATF-provided "Fast and Furious" guns alongside the bodies of murdered federal agents should certainly attract more notice from the American public than a Hollywood actor dying in a fiery car crash.

Granted, the senseless death of anyone is upsetting, but the greater tragedy is that while Walker's fans weep over the death of the movie actor, they, and many others, choose to remain oblivious to the very real 'fast and furious' threat Barack Obama and his corrupt administration pose to the entire country.

Still, prayers go up for Paul William Walker IV, and may he rest in peace.

But meanwhile an even more crucial appeal needs to be made, before fast and furious 'joy rider' Obama takes the nation full throttle toward its own crash and burn.

Jeannie hosts a blog at http://www.jeannie-ology.com/

Paul Walker, the star of several action films that feature street racing and car heists, tragically lost his life recently after a charity event in Santa Clarita, California. Walker was in the passenger seat of his friend Roger Rodas's red Porsche when the speeding vehicle crashed into a tree and burst into flames, killing both men.

Just 40 years old, Walker played a huge part in Universal's biggest movie franchise of all time. As of October of this year, The Fast and the Furious had earned $2,380,084,668 on the original, six sequels, two related short films, plus a video game series. Fast and Furious 7 is currently in production.

Now, fans of the series and fans of Paul Walker are shocked and grief-stricken over the star's untimely death. Yet sadly, there is an even greater tragedy revealed in the wake of Walker's demise.

Judging from public reaction, it seems as if many Americans know more about the Fast and Furious actor than the two federal agents and hundreds of innocent Mexicans murdered with "Fast and Furious" guns supplied to drug gangs by an ATF/US government gun-running operation.

The less glamorous "Fast and Furious" operation didn't have fast cars or hot blue-eyed movie stars. Instead, it was a harebrained production that was purportedly implemented as an effort to track illegal guns from the U.S. to Mexico whose cast of characters included shady gun walkers, gangs, and drug cartels.

The Obama Administration-approved, straw-purchased 2,000-gun "Fast and Furious" cache included AK-47 semi-automatic and .50 caliber rifles. Two of those weapons were responsible for the deaths of Border agent Brian Terry, who, like Paul Walker, was just 40 years old when he died, and ICE agent Jaime Zapata, who was 35 years old when ambushed and shot dead in a separate incident.

What's not surprising is that despite the large number of casualties that resulted from the botched operation, the U.S. government has yet to track down most of the missing guns.

Making a comparison between the two "Fast and Furious" stories is certainly not to minimize the tragic, untimely death of a young actor, or to politicize an unfortunate accident. Rather, it's an attempt to point out that finding ATF-provided "Fast and Furious" guns alongside the bodies of murdered federal agents should certainly attract more notice from the American public than a Hollywood actor dying in a fiery car crash.

Granted, the senseless death of anyone is upsetting, but the greater tragedy is that while Walker's fans weep over the death of the movie actor, they, and many others, choose to remain oblivious to the very real 'fast and furious' threat Barack Obama and his corrupt administration pose to the entire country.

Still, prayers go up for Paul William Walker IV, and may he rest in peace.

But meanwhile an even more crucial appeal needs to be made, before fast and furious 'joy rider' Obama takes the nation full throttle toward its own crash and burn.

Jeannie hosts a blog at http://www.jeannie-ology.com/