University student told to remove cross necklace by school official

Even the diversity freaks believe this incident goes too far.

Fox News:

Audrey Jarvis, 19, a liberal arts major at the northern California university, said she had no choice but to seek a "religious accommodation" in order to wear the cross. Her lawyer said she deserves an apology, and the school seems ready to oblige.

"It's amazing in this day of diversity and tolerance on university campuses that a university official would engage in this type of obvious religious discrimination," said Hiram Sasser, an attorney with Liberty Institute, which is representing Jarvis.

Jarvis was working for the university's Associated Students Productions at a June 27 student orientation fair for incoming freshmen when her supervisor told her to remove the two-inch-long cross necklace, according to Sasser.

Sasser said the supervisor told her that the chancellor had a policy against wearing religious items and further explained "that she could not wear her cross necklace because it might offend others, it might make incoming students feel unwelcome, or it might cause incoming students to feel that ASP was not an organization they should join."

"My initial reaction was one of complete shock," Jarvis told Fox News. "I was thrown for a loop."

Jarvis said she is a devout Catholic and she wears the cross as a symbol of her faith in Christ.

"I was offended because I believe as a Christian woman it is my prerogative to display my faith any way I like so long as it is not harming anyone else," she said. "I was very hurt and felt as if the university's mission statement - which includes tolerance and inclusivity to all - was violated."

On a second encounter, her supervisor told her she should hide the cross under her shirt or remove it.

At that point, Jarvis became so upset she left her student worker job early.

More evidence of a "War on Christians"? More like a war on reason. The basis for speech codes at colleges is to prevent offending anyone. But there is no constitutional right to be free from having someone's speech offend you, and a very clear constitutional right to use offensive speech - within limits. Fighting words are out but anything short of that is protected - supposedly - by the First Amendment.

I often wonder when I read stories like this what the Free Speech kids who occupied the Dean's office at UC Berkeley back in the 1960's would have thought of these incidents. Those supervisors and school officials are the direct descendants of those kids and I suppose you could make either argument; that they have lost their way or that speech codes are the inevitable outgrowth of their beliefs at that time.

Either way, things have got to change.



Even the diversity freaks believe this incident goes too far.

Fox News:

Audrey Jarvis, 19, a liberal arts major at the northern California university, said she had no choice but to seek a "religious accommodation" in order to wear the cross. Her lawyer said she deserves an apology, and the school seems ready to oblige.

"It's amazing in this day of diversity and tolerance on university campuses that a university official would engage in this type of obvious religious discrimination," said Hiram Sasser, an attorney with Liberty Institute, which is representing Jarvis.

Jarvis was working for the university's Associated Students Productions at a June 27 student orientation fair for incoming freshmen when her supervisor told her to remove the two-inch-long cross necklace, according to Sasser.

Sasser said the supervisor told her that the chancellor had a policy against wearing religious items and further explained "that she could not wear her cross necklace because it might offend others, it might make incoming students feel unwelcome, or it might cause incoming students to feel that ASP was not an organization they should join."

"My initial reaction was one of complete shock," Jarvis told Fox News. "I was thrown for a loop."

Jarvis said she is a devout Catholic and she wears the cross as a symbol of her faith in Christ.

"I was offended because I believe as a Christian woman it is my prerogative to display my faith any way I like so long as it is not harming anyone else," she said. "I was very hurt and felt as if the university's mission statement - which includes tolerance and inclusivity to all - was violated."

On a second encounter, her supervisor told her she should hide the cross under her shirt or remove it.

At that point, Jarvis became so upset she left her student worker job early.

More evidence of a "War on Christians"? More like a war on reason. The basis for speech codes at colleges is to prevent offending anyone. But there is no constitutional right to be free from having someone's speech offend you, and a very clear constitutional right to use offensive speech - within limits. Fighting words are out but anything short of that is protected - supposedly - by the First Amendment.

I often wonder when I read stories like this what the Free Speech kids who occupied the Dean's office at UC Berkeley back in the 1960's would have thought of these incidents. Those supervisors and school officials are the direct descendants of those kids and I suppose you could make either argument; that they have lost their way or that speech codes are the inevitable outgrowth of their beliefs at that time.

Either way, things have got to change.



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