IRS asked pro-life group about their prayers?

Rick Moran
I suppose this means that if pro-life people prayed to a GOP victory, they would have been denied tax exempt status.

Washington Examiner:

During a House Ways and Means Committee hearing today, Rep. Aaron Schock, R-Ill., grilled outgoing IRS commissioner Steven Miller about the IRS targeting a pro-life group in Iowa.

"Their question, specifically asked from the IRS to the Coalition for Life of Iowa: 'Please detail the content of the members of your organization's prayers,'" Schock declared.

"Would that be an inappropriate question to a 501 c3 applicant?" asked Schock. "The content of one's prayers?"

"It pains me to say I can't speak to that one either," Miller replied.

It doesn't pain him at all. It was clear by this point in the hearing that Miller had decided to give Republican members absolutely nothing with which they could criticize him or the IRS - even something so outrageously intrusive as being forced to reveal the content of a group's prayers.

Miller claimed it would "surprise" him if that question were asked. They should have asked him if he were "surprised" when his employees asked groups about their donors, their reading lists, and other inappropriate questions that violated the First Amendment rights of American citizens.

No doubt it would "pain" him too.

I suppose this means that if pro-life people prayed to a GOP victory, they would have been denied tax exempt status.

Washington Examiner:

During a House Ways and Means Committee hearing today, Rep. Aaron Schock, R-Ill., grilled outgoing IRS commissioner Steven Miller about the IRS targeting a pro-life group in Iowa.

"Their question, specifically asked from the IRS to the Coalition for Life of Iowa: 'Please detail the content of the members of your organization's prayers,'" Schock declared.

"Would that be an inappropriate question to a 501 c3 applicant?" asked Schock. "The content of one's prayers?"

"It pains me to say I can't speak to that one either," Miller replied.

It doesn't pain him at all. It was clear by this point in the hearing that Miller had decided to give Republican members absolutely nothing with which they could criticize him or the IRS - even something so outrageously intrusive as being forced to reveal the content of a group's prayers.

Miller claimed it would "surprise" him if that question were asked. They should have asked him if he were "surprised" when his employees asked groups about their donors, their reading lists, and other inappropriate questions that violated the First Amendment rights of American citizens.

No doubt it would "pain" him too.