Herman Cain calls for Third Party

Sure, Herman. That's the way to beat the liberals. Help them divide and conquer:

Steve Schmidt, a top Republican strategist who ran John McCain's 2008 campaign, invoked the term on MSNBC this morning. "When I talk about a civil war in the Republican Party, what I mean is, it's time for Republican elected leaders to stand up and to repudiate this nonsense [of the extreme right wing], and to repudiate it directly," he said.

But on the other side of the fight, Herman Cain, the former presidential candidate who still has a robust following via his popular talk radio program and speaking tours, today suggested the most clear step to open civil war: secession. Appearing on Bryan Fischer's radio program this afternoon, Cain called for a large faction of Republican Party leaders to desert the party and form a third, more conservative party.

"I never thought that I would say this, and this is the first time publicly that I've said it: We need a third party to save this country. Not Ron Paul and the Ron Paulites. No. We need a legitimate third party to challenge the current system that we have, because I don't believe that the Republican Party ... has the ability to rebrand itself," Cain said.

Fischer, a social conservative leader, noted that he predicted this summer that if Mitt Romney loses, evangelical conservatives would start a third party. "If Barack Obama wins this election the Republican Party as we know it is finished, it is dead, it is toast," Fischer said in September at the Values Voter Summit in Washington.

Rush Limabugh, two months ago, echoed the sentiment. "If Obama wins, let me tell you what it's the end of: the Republican Party. There's gonna be a third party that's gonna be oriented toward conservatism," he said.

"It is more viable today than it has ever been," Cain told Fischer today of a third party.

Cain and those who agree with him are simply too lazy to do the spade work necessary to reform the GOP. It's hard work getting a massive organization like the Republican party to change. It's so much easier to posture for the media and declare that the job is too tough, can't be done, so we might as well make it easy on the Democrats and split conservatives in two.

Wrong time. Wrong idea. Wrong headed.


Sure, Herman. That's the way to beat the liberals. Help them divide and conquer:

Steve Schmidt, a top Republican strategist who ran John McCain's 2008 campaign, invoked the term on MSNBC this morning. "When I talk about a civil war in the Republican Party, what I mean is, it's time for Republican elected leaders to stand up and to repudiate this nonsense [of the extreme right wing], and to repudiate it directly," he said.

But on the other side of the fight, Herman Cain, the former presidential candidate who still has a robust following via his popular talk radio program and speaking tours, today suggested the most clear step to open civil war: secession. Appearing on Bryan Fischer's radio program this afternoon, Cain called for a large faction of Republican Party leaders to desert the party and form a third, more conservative party.

"I never thought that I would say this, and this is the first time publicly that I've said it: We need a third party to save this country. Not Ron Paul and the Ron Paulites. No. We need a legitimate third party to challenge the current system that we have, because I don't believe that the Republican Party ... has the ability to rebrand itself," Cain said.

Fischer, a social conservative leader, noted that he predicted this summer that if Mitt Romney loses, evangelical conservatives would start a third party. "If Barack Obama wins this election the Republican Party as we know it is finished, it is dead, it is toast," Fischer said in September at the Values Voter Summit in Washington.

Rush Limabugh, two months ago, echoed the sentiment. "If Obama wins, let me tell you what it's the end of: the Republican Party. There's gonna be a third party that's gonna be oriented toward conservatism," he said.

"It is more viable today than it has ever been," Cain told Fischer today of a third party.

Cain and those who agree with him are simply too lazy to do the spade work necessary to reform the GOP. It's hard work getting a massive organization like the Republican party to change. It's so much easier to posture for the media and declare that the job is too tough, can't be done, so we might as well make it easy on the Democrats and split conservatives in two.

Wrong time. Wrong idea. Wrong headed.


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