More signs Minnesota moving toward Romney

Rosslyn Smith
The StarTribune in Minneapolis reports, "As presidential race tightens, President Clinton plans a Minnesota visit."

When I saw this I had two thoughts. Slick Willy's his track record campaigning for others has never been strong to begin with and he was never all that popular in Minnesota. (Probably for reasons of personal style?) All in all this may be good news.

Meanwhile, ABC News has moved Minnesota from "safe" to "lean" Obama. Amy Walter writes:

So, what is happening in Minnesota? Demographics. As ourABC/Washington Post poll has shown, Romney has a substantial lead among white men. Minnesota is one of the least diverse states in the country with 90 percent of the electorate in 2008 made of white voters. In other Midwestern states with small minority populations, like Iowa and Wisconsin, the Obama campaign has flooded the airwaves for months with anti-Romney ads. They have done nothing of the sort in Minnesota.

Moreover, the airwaves in states like Ohio and Virginia are already heavily saturated. The ground game is the name of the game now in those places. That means that SuperPAC's with lots of money can get a better return on their investment  on the airwaves in places like Pennsylvania and Minnesota than in the  eight battleground states where the campaigns have been most heavily engaged.

The StarTribune in Minneapolis reports, "As presidential race tightens, President Clinton plans a Minnesota visit."

When I saw this I had two thoughts. Slick Willy's his track record campaigning for others has never been strong to begin with and he was never all that popular in Minnesota. (Probably for reasons of personal style?) All in all this may be good news.

Meanwhile, ABC News has moved Minnesota from "safe" to "lean" Obama. Amy Walter writes:

So, what is happening in Minnesota? Demographics. As ourABC/Washington Post poll has shown, Romney has a substantial lead among white men. Minnesota is one of the least diverse states in the country with 90 percent of the electorate in 2008 made of white voters. In other Midwestern states with small minority populations, like Iowa and Wisconsin, the Obama campaign has flooded the airwaves for months with anti-Romney ads. They have done nothing of the sort in Minnesota.

Moreover, the airwaves in states like Ohio and Virginia are already heavily saturated. The ground game is the name of the game now in those places. That means that SuperPAC's with lots of money can get a better return on their investment  on the airwaves in places like Pennsylvania and Minnesota than in the  eight battleground states where the campaigns have been most heavily engaged.