Obama fails to commemorate D-Day

Rick Moran
I was unable to determine if George Bush failed to commemerate D-Day during his 8 years in office, but somehow, I would think that veterans would have let him have it if he didn't.

President Obama gave a speech on the 65th anniversary of D-Day in 2009 but hasn't said anything about this solemn day since. There are some historians - Stephen Ambrose among the most prominent - who believe that D-Day was not only the most significant event of World War II, but also one of the most significant events in the last 500 years of world history.

An acknowledgement of the sacrifices of so many Americans on that fateful day would seem to be automatic if you're president. For Obama, nothing is automatic when it comes to American traditions and history.

Keith Koffler:

Instead of scheduling a brief event to mark the 68th anniversary of America's brutal landing on the shores of Normandy, Obama is already on his way to San Francisco, where he will hold two fundraisers before moving on to Beverly Hills to stage two more.

Obama failed to mark D-Day with either a speech or a written proclamation both last year or the year before. He did give a speech in 2009, the 65th anniversary of the event.

First Lady Michelle Obama, who has made much of her "Joining Forces" campaign to support military families, also has nothing planned for D-Day. She'll be in New York City for a fundraiser and then in Philadelphia to meet with campaign volunteers.

Obama's failure to mark D-Day in any significant way is both a shame and a political mistake.

"Scheduling a brief event" wouldn't have been necessary. How about an official proclamation commemerating the day?

There isn't one, but the White House did post a blog on D-Day, referring to the president's 2009 speech. I guess that qualifies as an "acknowledgement" but falls far short of what a president should be doing to call attention to the heroic deeds of our D-Day veterans who are fewer and fewer every year.



I was unable to determine if George Bush failed to commemerate D-Day during his 8 years in office, but somehow, I would think that veterans would have let him have it if he didn't.

President Obama gave a speech on the 65th anniversary of D-Day in 2009 but hasn't said anything about this solemn day since. There are some historians - Stephen Ambrose among the most prominent - who believe that D-Day was not only the most significant event of World War II, but also one of the most significant events in the last 500 years of world history.

An acknowledgement of the sacrifices of so many Americans on that fateful day would seem to be automatic if you're president. For Obama, nothing is automatic when it comes to American traditions and history.

Keith Koffler:

Instead of scheduling a brief event to mark the 68th anniversary of America's brutal landing on the shores of Normandy, Obama is already on his way to San Francisco, where he will hold two fundraisers before moving on to Beverly Hills to stage two more.

Obama failed to mark D-Day with either a speech or a written proclamation both last year or the year before. He did give a speech in 2009, the 65th anniversary of the event.

First Lady Michelle Obama, who has made much of her "Joining Forces" campaign to support military families, also has nothing planned for D-Day. She'll be in New York City for a fundraiser and then in Philadelphia to meet with campaign volunteers.

Obama's failure to mark D-Day in any significant way is both a shame and a political mistake.

"Scheduling a brief event" wouldn't have been necessary. How about an official proclamation commemerating the day?

There isn't one, but the White House did post a blog on D-Day, referring to the president's 2009 speech. I guess that qualifies as an "acknowledgement" but falls far short of what a president should be doing to call attention to the heroic deeds of our D-Day veterans who are fewer and fewer every year.