Majority in Wisconsin now favor Walker recall

Rick Moran
Wisconsin conservatives and Governor Walker have some work to do between now and June 5 when the recall election is held. A Rasmussen survey shows a majority of voters in Wisconsin favor the governor's recall.

Washington Examiner:

A new Rasmussen poll finds that Republican Wisconsin Scott Walker is in trouble of being recalled June 5, with a majority, 52 percent, saying they will vote him out less than two years after he took office and immediately went to work to cut the power of public service unions.

The poll revealed a remarkable shift from February when 54 percent of Wisconsin voters said they would vote against the recall. In today's poll, just 47 percent said they would vote against recalling the governor. Details will be released at 1 p.m.

Worse for Walker: 53 percent disapprove of his job as governor with a whopping 46 percent saying they "strongly disapprove" of Walker. Majorities of both men and women now support his recall. Rasmussen found that his support among Republicans and conservatives remains strong.

With outside labor union money pouring into the state, and near hysterically energized opponents, Walker is going to have to develop an awesome ground game to see his way to victory. He did it before during his election battle in 2010 when his organizational muscle triumphed over his Democratic opponent Tom Barrett - who he might face again.

There's still time to flip those numbers and Walker, an experienced campaigner, will no doubt make good use of it.

Wisconsin conservatives and Governor Walker have some work to do between now and June 5 when the recall election is held. A Rasmussen survey shows a majority of voters in Wisconsin favor the governor's recall.

Washington Examiner:

A new Rasmussen poll finds that Republican Wisconsin Scott Walker is in trouble of being recalled June 5, with a majority, 52 percent, saying they will vote him out less than two years after he took office and immediately went to work to cut the power of public service unions.

The poll revealed a remarkable shift from February when 54 percent of Wisconsin voters said they would vote against the recall. In today's poll, just 47 percent said they would vote against recalling the governor. Details will be released at 1 p.m.

Worse for Walker: 53 percent disapprove of his job as governor with a whopping 46 percent saying they "strongly disapprove" of Walker. Majorities of both men and women now support his recall. Rasmussen found that his support among Republicans and conservatives remains strong.

With outside labor union money pouring into the state, and near hysterically energized opponents, Walker is going to have to develop an awesome ground game to see his way to victory. He did it before during his election battle in 2010 when his organizational muscle triumphed over his Democratic opponent Tom Barrett - who he might face again.

There's still time to flip those numbers and Walker, an experienced campaigner, will no doubt make good use of it.