Dick Lugar can't vote to save himself in his own primary

This is full of irony. Incumbent Senator Dick Lugar has been barred from voting in the Indiana primary on May 8 because a county election board ruled he is not a legal resident.

Politico:

Lugar immediately vowed to fight the ruling.

"I don't want to cast aspersions on anyone," Lugar told reporters on Capitol Hill Thursday, "but there has been a rather concerted campaign by self-appointed persons who believe this is the best way to settle the Indiana election."

The two-to-one party-line decision by the Marion County Election Board has important legal implications, but also resurrects the crippling narrative that Lugar is disconnected from Indiana, where he hasn't owned a home in more than three decades.

After reviewing the complaint submitted by Lugar's political opponents, the board ruled that there is "substantial reason to believe a non-criminal election law violation has occurred and ... the Lugars have abandoned the 3200 Highwoods Court residence and thus forfeited their respective abilities to lawfully vote."

The remedy appears to be straightforward: Submit a new voter registration form by April 9 with a new address to which Lugar has some ties.

But Lugar's camp trashed the finding as an "outrage" ginned up by Democrats and GOP rival Richard Mourdock.

What's weird is that Lugar was declared eligible to be on the ballot just last week. So he can run for senator but can't vote for himself? Perhaps the appeals court can sort it out.

In the meantime, Lugar's main rival for the GOP nomination, State Treasurer Richard Mourdock, was just handed some more ammunition in his battle with the long time incumbent. Mourdock is doing quite well and has a good shot to unseat Lugar.

But Lugar is still fairly popular in the state and if he can get this voting problem sorted out, will take the contest down to the wire.



This is full of irony. Incumbent Senator Dick Lugar has been barred from voting in the Indiana primary on May 8 because a county election board ruled he is not a legal resident.

Politico:

Lugar immediately vowed to fight the ruling.

"I don't want to cast aspersions on anyone," Lugar told reporters on Capitol Hill Thursday, "but there has been a rather concerted campaign by self-appointed persons who believe this is the best way to settle the Indiana election."

The two-to-one party-line decision by the Marion County Election Board has important legal implications, but also resurrects the crippling narrative that Lugar is disconnected from Indiana, where he hasn't owned a home in more than three decades.

After reviewing the complaint submitted by Lugar's political opponents, the board ruled that there is "substantial reason to believe a non-criminal election law violation has occurred and ... the Lugars have abandoned the 3200 Highwoods Court residence and thus forfeited their respective abilities to lawfully vote."

The remedy appears to be straightforward: Submit a new voter registration form by April 9 with a new address to which Lugar has some ties.

But Lugar's camp trashed the finding as an "outrage" ginned up by Democrats and GOP rival Richard Mourdock.

What's weird is that Lugar was declared eligible to be on the ballot just last week. So he can run for senator but can't vote for himself? Perhaps the appeals court can sort it out.

In the meantime, Lugar's main rival for the GOP nomination, State Treasurer Richard Mourdock, was just handed some more ammunition in his battle with the long time incumbent. Mourdock is doing quite well and has a good shot to unseat Lugar.

But Lugar is still fairly popular in the state and if he can get this voting problem sorted out, will take the contest down to the wire.



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