Unions, liberals take aim at Governor Walker with recall

Well, they've managed to collect enough signatures. But winning a recall election requires two things; an unpopular governor and a candidate to oppose him.

Walker's approval ratings are not spectacular, but they aren't in the dumps either. And so far, no Democrat has stepped forward to run.

Reuters:

The group United Wisconsin, which opposes the collective bargaining changes and other measures Walker pushed into law last year, said it gathered more than 1 million signatures to recall the governor by the January 17 deadline -- roughly double the 540,208 signatures required.

The signatures represent about a quarter of all votes cast in the state in the 2010 election that brought Walker to power -- a reminder of both the controversy that surrounds the 44-year-old governor and the deep divisions within Wisconsin as it moves into a second round of recall elections triggered by the collective bargaining fight.

The petitions arrived in the state capital on Tuesday in a U-Haul truck decorated with a banner that read, "We did it for Wisconsin's future."

Julie Wells, the factory worker and grandmother who helped trigger the recall effort, took the first of more than 150 boxes into the Government Accountability Board's offices.

"What we have done over the past 60 days for the state of Wisconsin is monumental," Wells told a crowd of about 400 recall supporters.

The petitions must be certified, but with a gubernatorial recall election increasingly likely, Walker faces the prospect of becoming just the third governor in history to be recalled.

Still, Wisconsin remains remarkably split and it is possible that Walker could survive a special election.

Last summer, after forging ahead with an agenda that included the successful passage of voter ID and concealed carry legislation, six Republican senators faced recall. Ultimately, only two were recalled.

The reason that Democrats aren't lining up to oppose Walker is that his approval is in the mid-40's and has risen slightly over the past three months. In other words, chances aren't good that the Democratic candidate will be successful.

Besides that, Walker has proven himself a formidable campaigner. Given all the factors involved, most prominent Democrats in the state are going to think twice about running against him - recall or no.

Well, they've managed to collect enough signatures. But winning a recall election requires two things; an unpopular governor and a candidate to oppose him.

Walker's approval ratings are not spectacular, but they aren't in the dumps either. And so far, no Democrat has stepped forward to run.

Reuters:

The group United Wisconsin, which opposes the collective bargaining changes and other measures Walker pushed into law last year, said it gathered more than 1 million signatures to recall the governor by the January 17 deadline -- roughly double the 540,208 signatures required.

The signatures represent about a quarter of all votes cast in the state in the 2010 election that brought Walker to power -- a reminder of both the controversy that surrounds the 44-year-old governor and the deep divisions within Wisconsin as it moves into a second round of recall elections triggered by the collective bargaining fight.

The petitions arrived in the state capital on Tuesday in a U-Haul truck decorated with a banner that read, "We did it for Wisconsin's future."

Julie Wells, the factory worker and grandmother who helped trigger the recall effort, took the first of more than 150 boxes into the Government Accountability Board's offices.

"What we have done over the past 60 days for the state of Wisconsin is monumental," Wells told a crowd of about 400 recall supporters.

The petitions must be certified, but with a gubernatorial recall election increasingly likely, Walker faces the prospect of becoming just the third governor in history to be recalled.

Still, Wisconsin remains remarkably split and it is possible that Walker could survive a special election.

Last summer, after forging ahead with an agenda that included the successful passage of voter ID and concealed carry legislation, six Republican senators faced recall. Ultimately, only two were recalled.

The reason that Democrats aren't lining up to oppose Walker is that his approval is in the mid-40's and has risen slightly over the past three months. In other words, chances aren't good that the Democratic candidate will be successful.

Besides that, Walker has proven himself a formidable campaigner. Given all the factors involved, most prominent Democrats in the state are going to think twice about running against him - recall or no.

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