Whopping 90% of Americans think the economy stinks

Rick Moran
It's from a new CNN poll which showed 81% believing the economy stunk in June. Those who thought it couldn't get any worse were apparently disabused of that notion:

Three years after a financial crisis pushed the country deep into recession, an overwhelming number of Americans - 90% - say that economic conditions remain poor.

The number, reported Friday in a new CNN/ORC International Poll, is the highest of Barack Obama's presidency and a significant increase from the 81% who said conditions were poor in June.

The persistent pessimism indicates that Americans are feeling a level of hardship in line with the official statistics. Unemployment stands at 9.1%, economic growth is barely above stall speed, and the housing market remains tied in knots.

For a White House now fully engaged in re-election efforts, there is one shred of good news: More than two and half years after inauguration day, Americans are still more likely to blame former President George W. Bush for current economic conditions.

Asked which administration is to blame, 52% of Americans blame the previous Republican regime, while only 32% point a finger at Obama and Democrats.

Other polls show the gap between who's to blame a lot narrower. Note also the curious use of the word "regime" to describe the Bush administration. America does not have "regimes" - it has "administrations" or "governments." CNN's description of the Bush administration as a banana republic is insulting and whoever id responsible for standardizing usage at the network should be ashamed.


It's from a new CNN poll which showed 81% believing the economy stunk in June. Those who thought it couldn't get any worse were apparently disabused of that notion:

Three years after a financial crisis pushed the country deep into recession, an overwhelming number of Americans - 90% - say that economic conditions remain poor.

The number, reported Friday in a new CNN/ORC International Poll, is the highest of Barack Obama's presidency and a significant increase from the 81% who said conditions were poor in June.

The persistent pessimism indicates that Americans are feeling a level of hardship in line with the official statistics. Unemployment stands at 9.1%, economic growth is barely above stall speed, and the housing market remains tied in knots.

For a White House now fully engaged in re-election efforts, there is one shred of good news: More than two and half years after inauguration day, Americans are still more likely to blame former President George W. Bush for current economic conditions.

Asked which administration is to blame, 52% of Americans blame the previous Republican regime, while only 32% point a finger at Obama and Democrats.

Other polls show the gap between who's to blame a lot narrower. Note also the curious use of the word "regime" to describe the Bush administration. America does not have "regimes" - it has "administrations" or "governments." CNN's description of the Bush administration as a banana republic is insulting and whoever id responsible for standardizing usage at the network should be ashamed.