Chevy Volt sales surge to 300 a month

Rick Moran
Great news. At this rate, in about the year 2386, the one millionth Chevy Volt will have been sold:

In August, GM sold 300 gasoline/electric Volts. Meanwhile, Nissan sold over 1,300 of its all-electric Nissan Leaf that month. In fact, the Leaf was the fourth best-selling of all alternative fuel vehicle that month, including hybrids and diesel cars, according to Intellichoice.com.

September Volt sales will be revealed Monday when GM reports its monthly sales tally.

Not to worry, GM spokesman Rob Peterson said.

"I don't see any problem with reaching our goal," he said.

To be honest, the Volt is only offered in 7 markets so far. In the next couple of months, Volts will be sold in all 50 states which will almost certainly allow GM to reach its goal of 10,00 units by the end of the year.

The Volt will appeal to many drivers who don't have a long commute and use their car mostly for trips back and forth to the store and chauffering the kids around. It will find a niche, but at what cost? The sales are going to be subsidized at $7,500 per car. In this fiscal environment, why should the government be picking winners and losers in the private automobile market?


Great news. At this rate, in about the year 2386, the one millionth Chevy Volt will have been sold:

In August, GM sold 300 gasoline/electric Volts. Meanwhile, Nissan sold over 1,300 of its all-electric Nissan Leaf that month. In fact, the Leaf was the fourth best-selling of all alternative fuel vehicle that month, including hybrids and diesel cars, according to Intellichoice.com.

September Volt sales will be revealed Monday when GM reports its monthly sales tally.

Not to worry, GM spokesman Rob Peterson said.

"I don't see any problem with reaching our goal," he said.

To be honest, the Volt is only offered in 7 markets so far. In the next couple of months, Volts will be sold in all 50 states which will almost certainly allow GM to reach its goal of 10,00 units by the end of the year.

The Volt will appeal to many drivers who don't have a long commute and use their car mostly for trips back and forth to the store and chauffering the kids around. It will find a niche, but at what cost? The sales are going to be subsidized at $7,500 per car. In this fiscal environment, why should the government be picking winners and losers in the private automobile market?