CERN scientists question AGW models

The scientists at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) have made an historic contribution to the global warming debate.

Using a Proton Synchotron accelerator, the scientists have determined that cosmic rays are probably as responsible, or more responsible for cloud formation on earth than any human activity:

We've found that cosmic rays significantly enhance the formation of aerosol particles in the mid troposphere and above. These aerosols can eventually grow into the seeds for clouds. However, we've found that the vapours previously thought to account for all aerosol formation in the lower atmosphere can only account for a small fraction of the observations - even with the enhancement of cosmic rays."

Clouds are a big contributor to warming. Bottom line:

"[I]t is clear that the treatment of aerosol formation in climate models will need to be substantially revised, since all models assume that nucleation is caused by these vapours [sulphuric acid and ammonia] and water alone.

In other words, the inconvenient fact of the sun contributing to global warming was simply ignored in the past by climate modelers. Now it must be part of their calculations.

This thesis must be vetted by peers. And some conclusions will almost certainly be challenged. But for those scientists with an inquiring mind and honest heart, it calls into question how much of human activity is responsible for warming and if less than previously thought, are the solutions being offered the correct ones.


The scientists at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) have made an historic contribution to the global warming debate.

Using a Proton Synchotron accelerator, the scientists have determined that cosmic rays are probably as responsible, or more responsible for cloud formation on earth than any human activity:

We've found that cosmic rays significantly enhance the formation of aerosol particles in the mid troposphere and above. These aerosols can eventually grow into the seeds for clouds. However, we've found that the vapours previously thought to account for all aerosol formation in the lower atmosphere can only account for a small fraction of the observations - even with the enhancement of cosmic rays."

Clouds are a big contributor to warming. Bottom line:

"[I]t is clear that the treatment of aerosol formation in climate models will need to be substantially revised, since all models assume that nucleation is caused by these vapours [sulphuric acid and ammonia] and water alone.

In other words, the inconvenient fact of the sun contributing to global warming was simply ignored in the past by climate modelers. Now it must be part of their calculations.

This thesis must be vetted by peers. And some conclusions will almost certainly be challenged. But for those scientists with an inquiring mind and honest heart, it calls into question how much of human activity is responsible for warming and if less than previously thought, are the solutions being offered the correct ones.


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