WikiLeaks: Secret Cables Show Growing U.S. Concern Over China

Rick Moran
Frequent American Thinker contributor William Hawkins has an excellent summary of the Wikileaks scandal at Pajamas Media as it relates to our relations with China.

While we publicly continue to insist that we don't see China as a potential enemy, the secret cables reveal a different story; concern over China's growing confidence to assert its power in Africa while readying itself to compete commercially and militarily with the US in east Asia:

The People's Republic of China constantly warns against any return to "Cold War thinking" as inappropriate because Beijing is committed to a "peaceful rise" that does not threaten the interests of any other country. In a joint appearance with Chinese President Hu Jintao at the G20 summit in South Korea on Nov. 11, President Barack Obama seemed to agree, saying, "The U.S.-China relationship I think has become stronger over the last several years." State Department cables released by WikiLeaks reveal, however, a competition for influence between the U.S. and PRC in strategic areas very reminiscent of Cold War intrigue with the Soviet Union.A Feb. 23, 2010, cable from Johnnie Carson, asst. secretary of state for African Affairs, reported:

China is a very aggressive and pernicious economic competitor with no morals. ... There are trip wires for the United States when it comes to China. Is China developing a blue water navy?

Have they signed military base agreements? Are they training armies? Have they developed intelligence operations? Once these areas start developing then the U.S. will start worrying.

A cable from U.S. Ambassador to Kenya Michael Ranneberger sent six days earlier indicates it is time to start worrying. Ranneberger reports:

China is also providing weapons to the GOK [Government of Kenya] in support of its Somalia policies and increasing their involvement with the Kenyan National Security and Intelligence Service.

The US is also worried about China's apparent intent to build a blue water navy which is particularly sensitive given the issues of Taiwan and spreading Chinese influence in Southeast Asia.

Keeping the competition between China and the US peaceful and productive is going to be a challenge for any administration - Republican or Democratic - over the next decade.



Frequent American Thinker contributor William Hawkins has an excellent summary of the Wikileaks scandal at Pajamas Media as it relates to our relations with China.

While we publicly continue to insist that we don't see China as a potential enemy, the secret cables reveal a different story; concern over China's growing confidence to assert its power in Africa while readying itself to compete commercially and militarily with the US in east Asia:

The People's Republic of China constantly warns against any return to "Cold War thinking" as inappropriate because Beijing is committed to a "peaceful rise" that does not threaten the interests of any other country. In a joint appearance with Chinese President Hu Jintao at the G20 summit in South Korea on Nov. 11, President Barack Obama seemed to agree, saying, "The U.S.-China relationship I think has become stronger over the last several years." State Department cables released by WikiLeaks reveal, however, a competition for influence between the U.S. and PRC in strategic areas very reminiscent of Cold War intrigue with the Soviet Union.

A Feb. 23, 2010, cable from Johnnie Carson, asst. secretary of state for African Affairs, reported:

China is a very aggressive and pernicious economic competitor with no morals. ... There are trip wires for the United States when it comes to China. Is China developing a blue water navy?

Have they signed military base agreements? Are they training armies? Have they developed intelligence operations? Once these areas start developing then the U.S. will start worrying.

A cable from U.S. Ambassador to Kenya Michael Ranneberger sent six days earlier indicates it is time to start worrying. Ranneberger reports:

China is also providing weapons to the GOK [Government of Kenya] in support of its Somalia policies and increasing their involvement with the Kenyan National Security and Intelligence Service.

The US is also worried about China's apparent intent to build a blue water navy which is particularly sensitive given the issues of Taiwan and spreading Chinese influence in Southeast Asia.

Keeping the competition between China and the US peaceful and productive is going to be a challenge for any administration - Republican or Democratic - over the next decade.