Where's Mohammed? Where's Courage?

So now the Washington Post has joined the politically correct anti-America crowd by withdrawing its "Where's Mohammed?" cartoon (which didn't even have Mohammed in it) from the Sunday comics on October 3, 2010. Reason?  Yawn, here we go again, they didn't want to offend any Muslims.

I find bullies to be offensive. We've all experienced bullies on the playground. A bully is someone who hurts, frightens, or tyrannizes others in order to gain power.  Islamists bully by threatening with death or violence unless they get their way.  And have you noticed?  Everything has to be their way. 

And why is that?  Islam's goal is to take over the world.   One of the methods to accomplish this is to silence us so we won't say anything negative about Islam.  If nothing is said against it, Americans will be disarmed.  It is essential to know who our enemies are and what they are doing so that we can take action to protect ourselves.  Therefore, freedom to speak is crucial to our survival.

Perhaps some companies, like the Washington Post, are afraid that Islamist Terrorists will descend upon them so they want to show them that they are being "fair" and "tolerant", but the tolerance that they give won't be returned.  If people are silenced about Islam and Americans are intellectually disarmed, guess who will win the war? And the Islamists won't care who was fair or tolerant.  They will then descend on all of us, every single Infidel, and that includes the major newspapers in this country.

Obviously newspapers can print or withdraw any cartoon they like. This is one of those basic freedoms that we have in America, at least for now. I also have the freedom to decide who I want to do business with and unless companies can stand up for what is right, I will take my money elsewhere. You see, I take my freedom very personally and I get very upset with people who are aiding my destroyers. The way to defeat a bully is not to back down but to stand up. Throughout history it has taken courage to stand up to groups that want to silence and murder others.  I ask you Washington Post, where's yours?

Hat tip: Powerline
So now the Washington Post has joined the politically correct anti-America crowd by withdrawing its "Where's Mohammed?" cartoon (which didn't even have Mohammed in it) from the Sunday comics on October 3, 2010. Reason?  Yawn, here we go again, they didn't want to offend any Muslims.

I find bullies to be offensive. We've all experienced bullies on the playground. A bully is someone who hurts, frightens, or tyrannizes others in order to gain power.  Islamists bully by threatening with death or violence unless they get their way.  And have you noticed?  Everything has to be their way. 

And why is that?  Islam's goal is to take over the world.   One of the methods to accomplish this is to silence us so we won't say anything negative about Islam.  If nothing is said against it, Americans will be disarmed.  It is essential to know who our enemies are and what they are doing so that we can take action to protect ourselves.  Therefore, freedom to speak is crucial to our survival.

Perhaps some companies, like the Washington Post, are afraid that Islamist Terrorists will descend upon them so they want to show them that they are being "fair" and "tolerant", but the tolerance that they give won't be returned.  If people are silenced about Islam and Americans are intellectually disarmed, guess who will win the war? And the Islamists won't care who was fair or tolerant.  They will then descend on all of us, every single Infidel, and that includes the major newspapers in this country.

Obviously newspapers can print or withdraw any cartoon they like. This is one of those basic freedoms that we have in America, at least for now. I also have the freedom to decide who I want to do business with and unless companies can stand up for what is right, I will take my money elsewhere. You see, I take my freedom very personally and I get very upset with people who are aiding my destroyers. The way to defeat a bully is not to back down but to stand up. Throughout history it has taken courage to stand up to groups that want to silence and murder others.  I ask you Washington Post, where's yours?

Hat tip: Powerline

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