China blocks strategic minerals to Japan

Rick Moran
China's self confidence as a world power is beginning to grow as evidenced by their forays into Latin America, Africa, and southeast Asia.

Now the Chinese Communists are flexing their muscles against rival Japan. The Japanese seized a fishing boat they say was operating illegally in Japanese waters. China has retaliated by halting the sale of some rare earth minerals to the Japanese.

The New York Times:

Chinese customs officials are halting shipments to Japan of so-called rare earth elements, preventing them from being loading aboard ships at Chinese ports, industry officials said on Thursday.On Tuesday, Prime Minister Wen Jiabao personally called for Japan's release of the captain, who was detained after his vessel collided with two Japanese coast guard vessels about 40 minutes apart as he tried to fish in waters controlled by Japan but long claimed by China. Mr. Wen threatened unspecified further actions if Japan did not comply.

A Chinese Commerce Ministry spokesman declined on Thursday morning to discuss the country's trade policy on rare earths, saying only that Mr. Wen's comments remained the Chinese government's position. News agencies later reported that Chen Rongkai, another ministry spokesman, had denied that any embargo had been imposed.

One more sign that China is challenging our supremacy in the Pacific.

Hat Tip: Ed Lasky





China's self confidence as a world power is beginning to grow as evidenced by their forays into Latin America, Africa, and southeast Asia.

Now the Chinese Communists are flexing their muscles against rival Japan. The Japanese seized a fishing boat they say was operating illegally in Japanese waters. China has retaliated by halting the sale of some rare earth minerals to the Japanese.

The New York Times:

Chinese customs officials are halting shipments to Japan of so-called rare earth elements, preventing them from being loading aboard ships at Chinese ports, industry officials said on Thursday.

On Tuesday, Prime Minister Wen Jiabao personally called for Japan's release of the captain, who was detained after his vessel collided with two Japanese coast guard vessels about 40 minutes apart as he tried to fish in waters controlled by Japan but long claimed by China. Mr. Wen threatened unspecified further actions if Japan did not comply.

A Chinese Commerce Ministry spokesman declined on Thursday morning to discuss the country's trade policy on rare earths, saying only that Mr. Wen's comments remained the Chinese government's position. News agencies later reported that Chen Rongkai, another ministry spokesman, had denied that any embargo had been imposed.

One more sign that China is challenging our supremacy in the Pacific.

Hat Tip: Ed Lasky