GOP senators let Obama have it with both barrels

During a private luncheon with GOP senators, the duplicitous, audacious, dogmatic Obama was accused by contentious adversaries from the other side of the aisle of, "duplicity, audacity and unbending partisanship."

Joining the ranks of spirited politicians like Governor Christie of New Jersey and Jan Brewer of Arizona Bob Corker, first-term senator from Tennessee, over lunch, got up in Barry's face over what Corker perceives as the Obama administration's purposeful undermining of a "bipartisan financial regulation bill."

Corker shared, "I thought there was a degree of audacity in him even showing up today after what happened with financial regulation. I just wanted him to tell me how, when he ... comes over to a luncheon like ours today... does he reconcile that duplicity?"

The audacious Obama supposedly "bristled and defended his administration's handling of negotiations." 

Corker told reporters, ""I told him there was a tremendous disconnect from his words and the actions of his administration."  Is Corker just figuring this out?  If so, the recently elected senator from the Volunteer State is one fast learner.

In order to make Obama feel at home, "senators applauded" when the President "entered and left the room." Good thing because otherwise there was a chance Obama would have refused both entry and exit.

Two rounds of applause aside, emboldened Republican senators shared insightful sentiments about the Yes We Can president.  For instance, Pat Roberts (R-Kan) suggested Obama support big pharmaceuticals saying, "He needs to take a Valium before he comes in and talks to Republicans. He's pretty thin-skinned."

David Vitter, (R-La), addressed the Grand Poobama, "to demand overdue action" for the oil spill threatening the Louisiana Gulf coastline.  Vitter received "no specific response." No response, when it comes from Obama, is a response.

John McCain, (R-Az) stepped forward on behalf of immigration reform and pressed the president to, "secure the border first before taking other steps." Clearly, Barack Need-the-Hispanic-Vote Obama "didn't agree." 

The president plans on "taking other steps." Such as opposing Arizona's immigration law by counseling illegals to avoid ice cream shops, where Barry believes taking a "kid out to get ice cream," cone could get an innocent person "harassed." One never knows, maybe police could justify "reasonable suspicion" based on Oreos Cookies and Cream® being chosen over Nutty Coconut®. 

Apparently, McCain took it upon himself to remind the president about Obama administration members who, while "mischaracterizing" its contents, admitted to not reading the law.  "A very egregious act on their part," according to an irate Senator McCain.

Obama told McCain he had read the law, still agreed with its illiterate detractors and plans to stick to the original ice cream harassment argument.

As Obama was attempting to choke down lunch, Senator John Barrasso (R-Wyo) layered on contentiousness, like mayonnaise on a ham sandwich, by "complaining about the partisan genesis of the health care law, enacted without a single Republican vote in Congress."

It was right about the time Obama requested the armored Cadillac be warmed up.

Senator John Thune (R-SD) expressed, "What's really important is not so much the symbolism of bipartisanship as the action of bipartisanship." Thune then said, "What we haven't seen is sort of the matchup between the rhetoric and the actions to follow through."

Yet, Obama's symbolic actions actually do have substance.  This is a president, after being given a tepid response for a West Point commencement address, is sending a symbolically substantial message to the military by missing Memorial Day ceremony's at Arlington Cemetery, but plans to fly back in time to host a Paul McCartney concert at the White House.


Author's content: www.jeannie-ology.com

 

 

During a private luncheon with GOP senators, the duplicitous, audacious, dogmatic Obama was accused by contentious adversaries from the other side of the aisle of, "duplicity, audacity and unbending partisanship."

Joining the ranks of spirited politicians like Governor Christie of New Jersey and Jan Brewer of Arizona Bob Corker, first-term senator from Tennessee, over lunch, got up in Barry's face over what Corker perceives as the Obama administration's purposeful undermining of a "bipartisan financial regulation bill."

Corker shared, "I thought there was a degree of audacity in him even showing up today after what happened with financial regulation. I just wanted him to tell me how, when he ... comes over to a luncheon like ours today... does he reconcile that duplicity?"

The audacious Obama supposedly "bristled and defended his administration's handling of negotiations." 

Corker told reporters, ""I told him there was a tremendous disconnect from his words and the actions of his administration."  Is Corker just figuring this out?  If so, the recently elected senator from the Volunteer State is one fast learner.

In order to make Obama feel at home, "senators applauded" when the President "entered and left the room." Good thing because otherwise there was a chance Obama would have refused both entry and exit.

Two rounds of applause aside, emboldened Republican senators shared insightful sentiments about the Yes We Can president.  For instance, Pat Roberts (R-Kan) suggested Obama support big pharmaceuticals saying, "He needs to take a Valium before he comes in and talks to Republicans. He's pretty thin-skinned."

David Vitter, (R-La), addressed the Grand Poobama, "to demand overdue action" for the oil spill threatening the Louisiana Gulf coastline.  Vitter received "no specific response." No response, when it comes from Obama, is a response.

John McCain, (R-Az) stepped forward on behalf of immigration reform and pressed the president to, "secure the border first before taking other steps." Clearly, Barack Need-the-Hispanic-Vote Obama "didn't agree." 

The president plans on "taking other steps." Such as opposing Arizona's immigration law by counseling illegals to avoid ice cream shops, where Barry believes taking a "kid out to get ice cream," cone could get an innocent person "harassed." One never knows, maybe police could justify "reasonable suspicion" based on Oreos Cookies and Cream® being chosen over Nutty Coconut®. 

Apparently, McCain took it upon himself to remind the president about Obama administration members who, while "mischaracterizing" its contents, admitted to not reading the law.  "A very egregious act on their part," according to an irate Senator McCain.

Obama told McCain he had read the law, still agreed with its illiterate detractors and plans to stick to the original ice cream harassment argument.

As Obama was attempting to choke down lunch, Senator John Barrasso (R-Wyo) layered on contentiousness, like mayonnaise on a ham sandwich, by "complaining about the partisan genesis of the health care law, enacted without a single Republican vote in Congress."

It was right about the time Obama requested the armored Cadillac be warmed up.

Senator John Thune (R-SD) expressed, "What's really important is not so much the symbolism of bipartisanship as the action of bipartisanship." Thune then said, "What we haven't seen is sort of the matchup between the rhetoric and the actions to follow through."

Yet, Obama's symbolic actions actually do have substance.  This is a president, after being given a tepid response for a West Point commencement address, is sending a symbolically substantial message to the military by missing Memorial Day ceremony's at Arlington Cemetery, but plans to fly back in time to host a Paul McCartney concert at the White House.


Author's content: www.jeannie-ology.com

 

 

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