Islamic Terrorist Nidal Hasan on Presidential Task Force

Lance Fairchok
The news that Dr. Nidal Hasan served on a Presidential Transition task force and helped set national security priorities continues to be ignored by the media. It reveals the extent to which political ideology has crippled common sense in the conduct of national security affairs, leaving us vulnerable to our sworn enemies.

In the proceedings report for the Presidential Transition Task Force entitled, "Thinking Anew -- Security Priorities for the Next Administration," in APPENDIX C Task Force Event Participants, on page 29, we find the name of Nidal Hasan, Uniformed Services University School of Medicine.  This is the same Nidal Hasan, Major, US Army, who murdered and maimed fellow soldiers at Ft Hood.  This is the same Nidal Hasan who had been spouting Jihadist rhetoric and defending radical Islam for years without disciplinary action or censure.  This is the same Nidal Hasan who communicated with Islamic radicals and was tracked by the FBI.

Political correctness and group exceptionalism let him, and probably others, skip by.  Fear of the never materializing "backlash" against Muslims just because a few radicals kill people results in de-facto blinders.  If he were a member of a militia however, he would have been out.  The DOD's security clearance questionnaire asks about militia membership, but not a peep about radical or violent Islamic groups.

You can see Hasan acknowledged (page 32 here), but it is worthwhile reading the document. But be prepared to get angry.  The authors and participants are serious. How safe should we feel?

George Washington University's Homeland Security Policy Institute published the document.  The executive summary starts out full of hope and change:

The nation is in the midst of a crossroads in its consideration of security policy.  A coherent strategy to address 21st century threats to the United States, one that treats national and homeland security as a seamless whole, has yet to emerge.  Washington is now marked by a new Administration, a new tone, and a new space - offering a rare opportunity to catch our collective breath, to think creatively and anew about the most vexing challenges this country faces, and to put the most powerful of those reasoned ideas into action.


A new tone of reasoned ideas put into action. The arrogance is breathtaking, coming from the crowd whose inclusiveness and diversity extended to an out of the closet Islamist.


The news that Dr. Nidal Hasan served on a Presidential Transition task force and helped set national security priorities continues to be ignored by the media. It reveals the extent to which political ideology has crippled common sense in the conduct of national security affairs, leaving us vulnerable to our sworn enemies.

In the proceedings report for the Presidential Transition Task Force entitled, "Thinking Anew -- Security Priorities for the Next Administration," in APPENDIX C Task Force Event Participants, on page 29, we find the name of Nidal Hasan, Uniformed Services University School of Medicine.  This is the same Nidal Hasan, Major, US Army, who murdered and maimed fellow soldiers at Ft Hood.  This is the same Nidal Hasan who had been spouting Jihadist rhetoric and defending radical Islam for years without disciplinary action or censure.  This is the same Nidal Hasan who communicated with Islamic radicals and was tracked by the FBI.

Political correctness and group exceptionalism let him, and probably others, skip by.  Fear of the never materializing "backlash" against Muslims just because a few radicals kill people results in de-facto blinders.  If he were a member of a militia however, he would have been out.  The DOD's security clearance questionnaire asks about militia membership, but not a peep about radical or violent Islamic groups.

You can see Hasan acknowledged (page 32 here), but it is worthwhile reading the document. But be prepared to get angry.  The authors and participants are serious. How safe should we feel?

George Washington University's Homeland Security Policy Institute published the document.  The executive summary starts out full of hope and change:

The nation is in the midst of a crossroads in its consideration of security policy.  A coherent strategy to address 21st century threats to the United States, one that treats national and homeland security as a seamless whole, has yet to emerge.  Washington is now marked by a new Administration, a new tone, and a new space - offering a rare opportunity to catch our collective breath, to think creatively and anew about the most vexing challenges this country faces, and to put the most powerful of those reasoned ideas into action.


A new tone of reasoned ideas put into action. The arrogance is breathtaking, coming from the crowd whose inclusiveness and diversity extended to an out of the closet Islamist.