New York Times changes headline on their own poll

It is not unusual for a newspaper to change a headline on a story from edition to edition. This is true especially if the story has been updated or changed to reflect additional information.

But this New York Times story on the poll they took regarding Obama's handling of the economy is remarkable for the change in headlines from just a few hours ago to now.

When I saw the story this morning on Memeorandum, the headline of a story about a New York Times poll read:

"In Poll, Obama seen as ineffective on the economy."

What does the headline read now?

"Obama poll sees doubt on budget and health care"

The adjective "ineffective" has been dropped as has the broader measurement "economy" in favor of the softer words "doubt" and "budget and health care respectively. The night headline editor probably caught hell for that first hed.

A not very subtle example of bias from the Times.

It is not unusual for a newspaper to change a headline on a story from edition to edition. This is true especially if the story has been updated or changed to reflect additional information.

But this New York Times story on the poll they took regarding Obama's handling of the economy is remarkable for the change in headlines from just a few hours ago to now.

When I saw the story this morning on Memeorandum, the headline of a story about a New York Times poll read:

"In Poll, Obama seen as ineffective on the economy."

What does the headline read now?

"Obama poll sees doubt on budget and health care"

The adjective "ineffective" has been dropped as has the broader measurement "economy" in favor of the softer words "doubt" and "budget and health care respectively. The night headline editor probably caught hell for that first hed.

A not very subtle example of bias from the Times.