Law Professor's Intifada

George Bisharat is a law professor at the University of California's Hastings Law School. Bisharat has been at the forefront of the efforts to implement an economic, cultural and academic boycott of Israel.  Bisharat also is leading the charge to have Israelis charged with war crimes over the recent Gaza invasion.
 
In yesterday’s New York Times, Bisharat got to repeat his charges in an article titled Israel on Trial.  In the piece, Bisharat uses the disputed accounts of atrocities by Israeli soldiers, which have been revealed to be based on rumors, to argue that Israel committed war crimes.
 
Bisharat’s long history of anti-Israeli writings is exposed in a post at Legal Insurrection Blog by Professor William Jacobson of Cornell Law School.  Jacobson, who went to law school with Bisharat, recounts how Bisharat and other academics laid the foundation for legal challenges to Israel decades ago by positioning the Palestinians as an indigenous people and forming coalitions with American Indians and other indigenous groups. Professor Jacobson is an American Thinker contributor.
 
Jacobson also documents how one of Bisharat’s narratives of victimization has been called into question.  Bisharat wrote a widely distributed article in 2007 about how Bisharat’s father was the victim of retaliation by an American Jewish art gallery owner, who cancelled an art showing for Bisharat’s father, based on alleged protests by the Sacramento Jewish community to the gallery showing the art of someone who took pride in his Palestinian heritage.  Bisharat’s account could not be verified because by 2007 all the direct participants in the supposed incident were dead; but Jacobson has uncovered a letter by people who would have been in a position to know about the incident, who deny Bisharat’s account.
 
The post is worth a read because it sheds light on the mindset of those who use false narratives of victimization to attack Israel.


George Bisharat is a law professor at the University of California's Hastings Law School. Bisharat has been at the forefront of the efforts to implement an economic, cultural and academic boycott of Israel.  Bisharat also is leading the charge to have Israelis charged with war crimes over the recent Gaza invasion.
 
In yesterday’s New York Times, Bisharat got to repeat his charges in an article titled Israel on Trial.  In the piece, Bisharat uses the disputed accounts of atrocities by Israeli soldiers, which have been revealed to be based on rumors, to argue that Israel committed war crimes.
 
Bisharat’s long history of anti-Israeli writings is exposed in a post at Legal Insurrection Blog by Professor William Jacobson of Cornell Law School.  Jacobson, who went to law school with Bisharat, recounts how Bisharat and other academics laid the foundation for legal challenges to Israel decades ago by positioning the Palestinians as an indigenous people and forming coalitions with American Indians and other indigenous groups. Professor Jacobson is an American Thinker contributor.
 
Jacobson also documents how one of Bisharat’s narratives of victimization has been called into question.  Bisharat wrote a widely distributed article in 2007 about how Bisharat’s father was the victim of retaliation by an American Jewish art gallery owner, who cancelled an art showing for Bisharat’s father, based on alleged protests by the Sacramento Jewish community to the gallery showing the art of someone who took pride in his Palestinian heritage.  Bisharat’s account could not be verified because by 2007 all the direct participants in the supposed incident were dead; but Jacobson has uncovered a letter by people who would have been in a position to know about the incident, who deny Bisharat’s account.
 
The post is worth a read because it sheds light on the mindset of those who use false narratives of victimization to attack Israel.