What's the big deal??

When reading the following in a recent Haaretz article I wondered what to be most amazed at.
"Israel finds it hard to explain to the world what is very clear from its point of view - the unacceptable threat posed to Sderot, Ashkelon and other areas. A foreign minister from a European country, who recently visited Israel, asked his hosts how many civilians have died since the Qassam rockets began falling. When he was told that there have been 15 dead in seven years, less than those killed in a large suicide bombing, the minister's response was almost disdainful."

Should it be the stunning cynicism of a visiting European bigwig, to whom mere 15 family tragedies are no big deal, and to be treated with disdain? Should it be the reaction of Israel's Livni, Olmert and Barak, who instead of showing this scum the door, are obligingly engaging in cease-fire talks with Hamas? Should it be their utter betrayal of the most basic rationale for the Jewish state -- established with a goal of allowing the Jews defend themselves, rather than being at the mercy of others for protection? Should it be the lack of emotion in the newspaper article reporting this outrage? Should it be the passivity of the Israelis, who, when being told that killing them is no big deal, feel no outrage? Should it be the naive, unsuspecting innocence of the citizens of the unnamed European country this foreign minister represents -- citizens who, in a case of a terrorist attack, will undoubtedly be told by their government not to worry because, after all, not that many were killed, and to proceed, as before, with accepting the legitimate difference in "cultures"?

So bizarre, one finds little to say. Other than "mind-boggling."
When reading the following in a recent Haaretz article I wondered what to be most amazed at.
"Israel finds it hard to explain to the world what is very clear from its point of view - the unacceptable threat posed to Sderot, Ashkelon and other areas. A foreign minister from a European country, who recently visited Israel, asked his hosts how many civilians have died since the Qassam rockets began falling. When he was told that there have been 15 dead in seven years, less than those killed in a large suicide bombing, the minister's response was almost disdainful."

Should it be the stunning cynicism of a visiting European bigwig, to whom mere 15 family tragedies are no big deal, and to be treated with disdain? Should it be the reaction of Israel's Livni, Olmert and Barak, who instead of showing this scum the door, are obligingly engaging in cease-fire talks with Hamas? Should it be their utter betrayal of the most basic rationale for the Jewish state -- established with a goal of allowing the Jews defend themselves, rather than being at the mercy of others for protection? Should it be the lack of emotion in the newspaper article reporting this outrage? Should it be the passivity of the Israelis, who, when being told that killing them is no big deal, feel no outrage? Should it be the naive, unsuspecting innocence of the citizens of the unnamed European country this foreign minister represents -- citizens who, in a case of a terrorist attack, will undoubtedly be told by their government not to worry because, after all, not that many were killed, and to proceed, as before, with accepting the legitimate difference in "cultures"?

So bizarre, one finds little to say. Other than "mind-boggling."