Jimmy Carter defines terrorism

David Bernstein of the Volokh Conspiracy caught the implications buried in Jimmy Carter's interview on Charlie Rose.

"I think any time any powerhouse takes military action when it's a high danger or almost an inevitability that women and children are going to be killed, I think that can be considered an act of terrorism, yes."

As Bernstein points out, such a definition makes any militarily-sophisticated power a terrorist if it fights just about any war. The United States was a terrorist in WW II, Korea, Vietnam and elsewhere. Too band that Carter didn't make that proposition part of his first campaign for president. That way, we probably would have been spared the Mullahs' revolution in Iran, the rise of Islamic terror, and becoming familiar with the term "stagflation."

Carter is making a strong case to win the title of worst president and worst ex-president.

Hat tip: Ed Lasky

David Bernstein of the Volokh Conspiracy caught the implications buried in Jimmy Carter's interview on Charlie Rose.

"I think any time any powerhouse takes military action when it's a high danger or almost an inevitability that women and children are going to be killed, I think that can be considered an act of terrorism, yes."

As Bernstein points out, such a definition makes any militarily-sophisticated power a terrorist if it fights just about any war. The United States was a terrorist in WW II, Korea, Vietnam and elsewhere. Too band that Carter didn't make that proposition part of his first campaign for president. That way, we probably would have been spared the Mullahs' revolution in Iran, the rise of Islamic terror, and becoming familiar with the term "stagflation."

Carter is making a strong case to win the title of worst president and worst ex-president.

Hat tip: Ed Lasky