Hillary Ad Backfiring

Reaction to Hilalry Clinton's "nuclear" ad shows that the piece may be backfiring on the candidate.

Some in the press have called foul at the ad that shows various children asleep in their bed with a phone ringing in the background. A voice over asks who you would rather be answering that phone in the middle of the night. The meaning is clear; Obama would not be able to handle a crisis.

In a conference call yesterday, the campaign couldn't answer a question about what crisis Hillary may have had to deal with:

Responding to the release of HRC's new TX TV ad, which asserts in no subtle terms that only she has the experience to deal with a major world crisis, and, relatedly, to keep your children safe, Slate's John Dickerson asked the obvious question: "What foreign policy moment would you point to in Hillary's career where she's been tested by crisis?" he said. Silence on the call. You could've knit a sweater in the time it took the usually verbose team of Mark Penn, Howard Wolfson and Lee Feinstein, Clinton's national security director, to find a cogent answer. And what they came up with was weak -- that she's been endorsed by many high ranking members of the uniformed military.
To some people, the ad evoked memories of the old "Daisy" ad by Lyndon Johnson. While the idea behind the "Daisy" ad was that Goldwater would blow up the world, the Clinton ad only questions Obama's experience.

It remains to be seen what kind of effect the ad will have on voters.
Reaction to Hilalry Clinton's "nuclear" ad shows that the piece may be backfiring on the candidate.

Some in the press have called foul at the ad that shows various children asleep in their bed with a phone ringing in the background. A voice over asks who you would rather be answering that phone in the middle of the night. The meaning is clear; Obama would not be able to handle a crisis.

In a conference call yesterday, the campaign couldn't answer a question about what crisis Hillary may have had to deal with:

Responding to the release of HRC's new TX TV ad, which asserts in no subtle terms that only she has the experience to deal with a major world crisis, and, relatedly, to keep your children safe, Slate's John Dickerson asked the obvious question: "What foreign policy moment would you point to in Hillary's career where she's been tested by crisis?" he said. Silence on the call. You could've knit a sweater in the time it took the usually verbose team of Mark Penn, Howard Wolfson and Lee Feinstein, Clinton's national security director, to find a cogent answer. And what they came up with was weak -- that she's been endorsed by many high ranking members of the uniformed military.
To some people, the ad evoked memories of the old "Daisy" ad by Lyndon Johnson. While the idea behind the "Daisy" ad was that Goldwater would blow up the world, the Clinton ad only questions Obama's experience.

It remains to be seen what kind of effect the ad will have on voters.