Bill Richardson Would Re-Investigate the Roswell Space Alien Incident

Rick Moran
Democratic presidential candidate Bill Richardson has promised that if elected, he would re-open the famous case of aliens crashing at Roswell, New Mexico in 1947:


Answering questions at a townhall meeting Friday, a Dell employee asked Richardson about the 1947 incident in which many people still believe a flying saucer landed near the eastern New Mexico town.

"I've been in government a long time, I've been in the cabinet, I've been in the Congress and I've always felt that the government doesn't tell the truth as much as it should on a lot of issues," said Richardson, who is governor of New Mexico.

"When I was in Congress I said (to the) Department of Defense ... 'What is the data? What is the data you have?' " He was told that the records were classified. "That ticked me off," he said, as the crowd laughed.

"What do you want me to do? You want me to open up all those files?" he asked the alien enthusiast, who answered that he did. "I'll work with you on that."
Richardson, a former* governor of New Mexico, is playing right into the hands of the UFO nuts who simply can't accept a mundane explanation for the events surrounding the July 8, 1947 announcement by the Air Force that they had found a "flying disk."

Time Magazine related the real story back in 1997 that the UFO afficionados refuse to believe:

A mysterious crash, dead extraterrestrials littering the landscape, a government cover-up. Today the incident near Roswell, N.M., is an elaborate tale, growing ever more so with time and mythic imagination. But when it happened, it was almost imperceptible.

The wreckage was strewn over a 200-yd. swath and consisted largely of rubber strips, tinfoil, wood sticks, Scotch tape, other tape with a floral design and what rancher W.W. ("Mac") Brazel described as a rather tough paper. On the day Brazel chanced upon the strange debris, June 14, 1947, he was making his rounds at the J.B. Foster sheep ranch, 85 miles northwest of Roswell. As he later recalled, he was in a hurry and didn't pay much attention to the scattered assortment.

Ten days after Brazel's chance discovery, pilot Kenneth Arnold was flying near Washington State's Cascade Mountains when he spotted what he described as nine disklike objects flying in formation at about 1,200 m.p.h. Arnold's report, yet unexplained, immediately gave rise to other sightings, and by July 4, newspapers were heralding literally hundreds of reports of "flying saucers" in skies across the nation.

But Brazel had no radio in his ranch shack and was unaware of the sightings until July 5, when he drove to the nearby town of Corona, heard about the saucers and may have learned of a rumored reward for anyone who recovered one. By then, Brazel later told the Roswell Daily Record, he had already returned to the littered field with his wife and two children, gathered the debris and taken it home. On July 7, while in Roswell to sell wool, Brazel dropped by the office of Sheriff George Wilcox, where, he recalled, he "whispered kinda confidential-like" that he might have found a flying disk. Sheriff Wilcox immediately phoned nearby Roswell Army Air Field, home of the 509th Bomb Group, and notified Major Jesse Marcel, the group intelligence officer.

Barely able to control his excitement, Marcel sped into town with counterintelligence corps officer Sheridan Cavitt, picked up Brazel and headed out to the ranch. After collecting the debris--which Brazel later reported weighed no more than 5 lbs.--
I reproduce the Time story in some detail because of the sheer ordinariness of the discovery at the time that has been blown all out of proportion over the years by city boosters, UFO enthusiasts, and conspiracy nuts. And, of course, the debunking of the myths surrounding Roswell has been done already when the General Accountability Office released a report on the incident that pointed to an Air Force program called "Project Mogul" that used extremely high altitude balloons to spy on the Soviets. It was one such balloon that detected the very first Soviet nuclear test.

The fact is, this story has been deliberately embellished through the years and any presidential candidate that would cater to the baser instincts of the people by promising to indulge their fantasies should probably have no business running for office.

* Richardson is actually the current governor of New Mexico
Democratic presidential candidate Bill Richardson has promised that if elected, he would re-open the famous case of aliens crashing at Roswell, New Mexico in 1947:


Answering questions at a townhall meeting Friday, a Dell employee asked Richardson about the 1947 incident in which many people still believe a flying saucer landed near the eastern New Mexico town.

"I've been in government a long time, I've been in the cabinet, I've been in the Congress and I've always felt that the government doesn't tell the truth as much as it should on a lot of issues," said Richardson, who is governor of New Mexico.

"When I was in Congress I said (to the) Department of Defense ... 'What is the data? What is the data you have?' " He was told that the records were classified. "That ticked me off," he said, as the crowd laughed.

"What do you want me to do? You want me to open up all those files?" he asked the alien enthusiast, who answered that he did. "I'll work with you on that."
Richardson, a former* governor of New Mexico, is playing right into the hands of the UFO nuts who simply can't accept a mundane explanation for the events surrounding the July 8, 1947 announcement by the Air Force that they had found a "flying disk."

Time Magazine related the real story back in 1997 that the UFO afficionados refuse to believe:

A mysterious crash, dead extraterrestrials littering the landscape, a government cover-up. Today the incident near Roswell, N.M., is an elaborate tale, growing ever more so with time and mythic imagination. But when it happened, it was almost imperceptible.

The wreckage was strewn over a 200-yd. swath and consisted largely of rubber strips, tinfoil, wood sticks, Scotch tape, other tape with a floral design and what rancher W.W. ("Mac") Brazel described as a rather tough paper. On the day Brazel chanced upon the strange debris, June 14, 1947, he was making his rounds at the J.B. Foster sheep ranch, 85 miles northwest of Roswell. As he later recalled, he was in a hurry and didn't pay much attention to the scattered assortment.

Ten days after Brazel's chance discovery, pilot Kenneth Arnold was flying near Washington State's Cascade Mountains when he spotted what he described as nine disklike objects flying in formation at about 1,200 m.p.h. Arnold's report, yet unexplained, immediately gave rise to other sightings, and by July 4, newspapers were heralding literally hundreds of reports of "flying saucers" in skies across the nation.

But Brazel had no radio in his ranch shack and was unaware of the sightings until July 5, when he drove to the nearby town of Corona, heard about the saucers and may have learned of a rumored reward for anyone who recovered one. By then, Brazel later told the Roswell Daily Record, he had already returned to the littered field with his wife and two children, gathered the debris and taken it home. On July 7, while in Roswell to sell wool, Brazel dropped by the office of Sheriff George Wilcox, where, he recalled, he "whispered kinda confidential-like" that he might have found a flying disk. Sheriff Wilcox immediately phoned nearby Roswell Army Air Field, home of the 509th Bomb Group, and notified Major Jesse Marcel, the group intelligence officer.

Barely able to control his excitement, Marcel sped into town with counterintelligence corps officer Sheridan Cavitt, picked up Brazel and headed out to the ranch. After collecting the debris--which Brazel later reported weighed no more than 5 lbs.--
I reproduce the Time story in some detail because of the sheer ordinariness of the discovery at the time that has been blown all out of proportion over the years by city boosters, UFO enthusiasts, and conspiracy nuts. And, of course, the debunking of the myths surrounding Roswell has been done already when the General Accountability Office released a report on the incident that pointed to an Air Force program called "Project Mogul" that used extremely high altitude balloons to spy on the Soviets. It was one such balloon that detected the very first Soviet nuclear test.

The fact is, this story has been deliberately embellished through the years and any presidential candidate that would cater to the baser instincts of the people by promising to indulge their fantasies should probably have no business running for office.

* Richardson is actually the current governor of New Mexico