The NYT outdoes itself today

Ed Lasky
The New York Times outdoes itself: an essay by Noah Feldman on Israel and the Palestinians consigns some history to the Memory Hole.

Touting the charms of Syria, The Baathist enemy of democracy in Iraq, in the travel section was not enough for today's New York Times. The magazine section had this essay by their periodic contributor-foreign policy expert Noah Feldman (who is a professor of law, not diplomacy, at New York University).

Here he blames Israel and America for the failure of the Palestinians and the rise of Hamas. How does Israel in particular play into this dynamic? By
"bombing Gaza last summer (in retaliation for the kidnapping of Israeli soldiers), a move that further weakened Abbas and his Fatah party".
Feldman does not even deign to report the fact that Israel had completely removed itself from Gaza, turning it over to the Palestinians, lock, stock, and barrel. Nor does he mention that any bombing attacks against Gaza were not acts of "retaliation" ( a word with pejorative connotations), but were meant to suppress the thousands of missiles launched into Israel from the Gaza that were meant to terrorize, maim and kill Israelis. His wording makes it seem as if Israel were engaging in collective punishment and was indiscriminate in its targeting. In fact, Israel exposes its pilots to greater danger by trying to be very precise and deliberate in its targeting-only aiming to stop the terrorist and focusing on minimizing the damage while trying its utmost to minimize civilian casualties.

He did not even mention these endless rounds of rocket attacks; not a single word.

He also asserts that the "peace process was all but abandoned by America in 2000" (the advent of the Bush Presidency). Rick Richman obliterated this fantasy in "Blaming Bush for Gaza" wherein he analyzes the abroad and ambitious range of plans and actions that President Bush has taken over the years to bring peace to the region (among them, committing the US to oversee the establishment of a Palestinian state).

Feldman refers contemptuously to the "rump Palestinian Government" in the West Bank. In fact, the new head of this so-called "rump" government is independent lawmaker Salam Fayad, a widely respected international economist trusted by many people throughout the world, and among the Palestinians themselves. He cracked down on fraud when he was the Finance Minister and now has a greater set of responsibilities and power. He is the type of leader who should be supported.
 
Instead, Feldman seems to have disdain for this "rump" government and  seemingly supports Hamas
.


Then, to top it off, Feldman seems to advocate the release of terror mastermind Marwan Bhargouti from Israeli prisons, where he is confined because he was responsible for the murder of many Israelis. Yes, just what Israel needs now: more criminals and terror masterminds out on the streets.

This from a professor law.

The New York Times outdoes itself: an essay by Noah Feldman on Israel and the Palestinians consigns some history to the Memory Hole.

Touting the charms of Syria, The Baathist enemy of democracy in Iraq, in the travel section was not enough for today's New York Times. The magazine section had this essay by their periodic contributor-foreign policy expert Noah Feldman (who is a professor of law, not diplomacy, at New York University).

Here he blames Israel and America for the failure of the Palestinians and the rise of Hamas. How does Israel in particular play into this dynamic? By
"bombing Gaza last summer (in retaliation for the kidnapping of Israeli soldiers), a move that further weakened Abbas and his Fatah party".
Feldman does not even deign to report the fact that Israel had completely removed itself from Gaza, turning it over to the Palestinians, lock, stock, and barrel. Nor does he mention that any bombing attacks against Gaza were not acts of "retaliation" ( a word with pejorative connotations), but were meant to suppress the thousands of missiles launched into Israel from the Gaza that were meant to terrorize, maim and kill Israelis. His wording makes it seem as if Israel were engaging in collective punishment and was indiscriminate in its targeting. In fact, Israel exposes its pilots to greater danger by trying to be very precise and deliberate in its targeting-only aiming to stop the terrorist and focusing on minimizing the damage while trying its utmost to minimize civilian casualties.

He did not even mention these endless rounds of rocket attacks; not a single word.

He also asserts that the "peace process was all but abandoned by America in 2000" (the advent of the Bush Presidency). Rick Richman obliterated this fantasy in "Blaming Bush for Gaza" wherein he analyzes the abroad and ambitious range of plans and actions that President Bush has taken over the years to bring peace to the region (among them, committing the US to oversee the establishment of a Palestinian state).

Feldman refers contemptuously to the "rump Palestinian Government" in the West Bank. In fact, the new head of this so-called "rump" government is independent lawmaker Salam Fayad, a widely respected international economist trusted by many people throughout the world, and among the Palestinians themselves. He cracked down on fraud when he was the Finance Minister and now has a greater set of responsibilities and power. He is the type of leader who should be supported.
 
Instead, Feldman seems to have disdain for this "rump" government and  seemingly supports Hamas
.


Then, to top it off, Feldman seems to advocate the release of terror mastermind Marwan Bhargouti from Israeli prisons, where he is confined because he was responsible for the murder of many Israelis. Yes, just what Israel needs now: more criminals and terror masterminds out on the streets.

This from a professor law.