Let the sun shine into the World Bank

Clarice Feldman
 The Wall Street Journal's Bret Stephens gives us a glimpse of what has been going on inside the corruption-riddled World Bank. (What started as a faux scandal instigated by staffers against the President of the Bank may end up with a bright spotlight being shined on an institution which punished real whistleblowers who highlight theft of funds meant to alleviate world poverty.)

A comparative analysis of project performance across six regions shows that during the tenure of Messrs. Sarbib and Madavo, Africa had the highest number of projects yet the lowest likely sustainability percentage, the lowest satisfactory percentage for bank performance and the lowest satisfactory borrower performance at implementation.

Mr. Sarbib was subsequently promoted to senior vice president before retiring last year. Mr. Madavo is a visiting professor at Georgetown. Both men recently signed a public letter calling on Paul Wolfowitz to resign for damaging the bank's reputation.

 The Wall Street Journal's Bret Stephens gives us a glimpse of what has been going on inside the corruption-riddled World Bank. (What started as a faux scandal instigated by staffers against the President of the Bank may end up with a bright spotlight being shined on an institution which punished real whistleblowers who highlight theft of funds meant to alleviate world poverty.)

A comparative analysis of project performance across six regions shows that during the tenure of Messrs. Sarbib and Madavo, Africa had the highest number of projects yet the lowest likely sustainability percentage, the lowest satisfactory percentage for bank performance and the lowest satisfactory borrower performance at implementation.

Mr. Sarbib was subsequently promoted to senior vice president before retiring last year. Mr. Madavo is a visiting professor at Georgetown. Both men recently signed a public letter calling on Paul Wolfowitz to resign for damaging the bank's reputation.