Jamaica and jihad

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David Paulin explores the strange fact that a number of prominent terrorists have connections to Jamaica and the Caribbean at ModernConservative.com. He points a finger at the alienated intellectual classes in many Caribbean islands, who have never been able to get over the imposition of slavery by the west. Jamaica comes in for particular focus.

To some extent, the island of 2.7 million also serves as an intellectual beacon for the region. The main campus for the University of the West Indies is on the island; and more than a few of its faculty propagate an anti—Western worldview. [....]

At academic conferences, political gatherings, and in the opinion pages of Jamaica's two Sunday newspapers, the discourse is animated by left—wing ideology, anti—Americanism, and a crackpot theory or two.

Some of this discourse is institutionalized in the educational system. At the University of the West Indies, for instance, 'colonialism' and 'slavery' are among the most popular subjects for books coming off the university's press. Jamaica's left—leaning People's National Party, a major booster of the university, has ruled the island for decades.

Among the anti—American intellectual establishment, Paulin finds an odd dweller:

...The Observer, the island's most virulently anti—American paper, is published by Jamaican businessman Gordon 'Butch' Stewart, who heads the Sandals and Beaches resorts which depend on American tourism. That elites like Stewart countenance such anti—Americanism, either explicitly or implicitly, is common not only in the Caribbean but in many Third World countries.

I am not ready to accept Paulin's label 'Caribbeanistan' for the danger from the spread of radical Islam among anti—Western elites. But it is still a worthwhile read.

Thomas Lifson 7 17 06

David Paulin explores the strange fact that a number of prominent terrorists have connections to Jamaica and the Caribbean at ModernConservative.com. He points a finger at the alienated intellectual classes in many Caribbean islands, who have never been able to get over the imposition of slavery by the west. Jamaica comes in for particular focus.

To some extent, the island of 2.7 million also serves as an intellectual beacon for the region. The main campus for the University of the West Indies is on the island; and more than a few of its faculty propagate an anti—Western worldview. [....]

At academic conferences, political gatherings, and in the opinion pages of Jamaica's two Sunday newspapers, the discourse is animated by left—wing ideology, anti—Americanism, and a crackpot theory or two.

Some of this discourse is institutionalized in the educational system. At the University of the West Indies, for instance, 'colonialism' and 'slavery' are among the most popular subjects for books coming off the university's press. Jamaica's left—leaning People's National Party, a major booster of the university, has ruled the island for decades.

Among the anti—American intellectual establishment, Paulin finds an odd dweller:

...The Observer, the island's most virulently anti—American paper, is published by Jamaican businessman Gordon 'Butch' Stewart, who heads the Sandals and Beaches resorts which depend on American tourism. That elites like Stewart countenance such anti—Americanism, either explicitly or implicitly, is common not only in the Caribbean but in many Third World countries.

I am not ready to accept Paulin's label 'Caribbeanistan' for the danger from the spread of radical Islam among anti—Western elites. But it is still a worthwhile read.

Thomas Lifson 7 17 06