The timing is perfect to decentralize DC

Much has been written about the pandemic-driven favorable aspects, promise, and implications of virtual working compared to traditional in-person interfaces.  We are all woke to the now known to be unnecessary complications, inconveniences and costs of physical offices, urban crime, commuting, and virus-transmitting.

Much less has been written about virtual management's implications for decentralizing the federal government and putting the decision-makers physically among the decision-affected — real instead of virtual reality.
 How about considering the following departmental tectonic shifts: Interior to Wyoming, Utah, or Colorado; Agriculture to Iowa, Nebraska, or South Dakota; and Commerce to Florida or Louisiana?

Regulators of the environment could literally step out their back doors and visit a forest, see a farm, soybean, cornfield, or cow; or visit a vibrant multicultural economy on the hemisphere's doorsteps.

Relocating individuals could cash in on D.C.'s inflated housing prices and boost their quality of life with bigger homes and maybe even a back 40, or at least a backyard.  Fourth of July parades in clean, healthy open air and Eagle Scouting could be reborn.

Sub-Cabinet-level relocation possibilities are equally endless: Fisheries to New England, FDA to the university-rich Research Triangle in North Carolina, and the FAA to an actual hub such as Nashville, St. Louis, or even Chicago.

The movement even lends itself to a catchy slogan, "Decentralize D.C.," which fits nicely on a bumper sticker.

Author's credits: Emisoras Unidas (ABC Radio affiliate), Canal Antigua TV, VOA (radio and TV), American Thinker,  BBC4, El Periodico, Cincinnati Enquirer, Guatemala Post, Atlantic, Washington Times, Mexico News Daily, St. Petersburg Times (comments).  MarriottGolden Circle award and numerous local recognitions.

Image via Pxhere.