Hypocritical dining-out LA County supervisor Sheila Kuehl is also part of federal corruption investigation

By now, you probably are familiar with the hypocrisy of Los Angeles County supervisor Sheila Kuehl, who went out for a meal at her favorite restaurant hours after voting to ban outdoor dining at restaurants, after stating that outdoor dining is:

"... a most dangerous situation" over what she described as a risk of tables of unmasked patrons potentially exposing their servers to the coronavirus.

"This is a serious health emergency and we must take it seriously," Kuehl said.

"The servers are not protected from us, and they're not protected from their other tables that they're serving at that particular time, plus all the hours in which they're working."

Her excuse, after a blizzard of publicity, was lame:

She did dine al fresco at Il Forno on the very last day it was permissible. She loves Il Forno, has been saddened to see it, like so many restaurants, suffer from a decline in revenue. She ate there, taking appropriate precautions, and sadly will not dine there again until our Public Health Orders permit.

 
YouTube screen grab.

If it is such a "serious emergency," then why take one last opportunity and expose herself (and the servers for whom she feigns concern) to "a most dangerous situation"?  If she is capable of "taking appropriate precautions," why aren't other Angelinos?

Obviously, she doesn't really believe she was exposing herself or anyone else to danger.  Supervisor Kuehl is 78 years old and obese, placing herself at high risk for COVID-19, so if "appropriate precautions" are good enough to allow her to dine outside at a restaurant, why shouldn't the vast majority of the population at less risk than she be allowed to do so?

But to get a sense of the character of Supervisor Kuehl, take a brief look at another scandal, currently under federal investigation, in which she played an apparently central role.  Fox 11 Los Angeles reported last September (hat tip: Jennifer Van Laar of RedState):

A months-long FOX 11 investigation has revealed that an L.A. Metro sexual harassment hotline operated by a local charity is currently costing taxpayers more than $8,000 per call after a series of no-bid contracts to operate the hotline were awarded to the best friend and campaign donor of L.A. County Supervisor & Metro board member Sheila Kuehl after her office privately pushed for Metro to hire the charity.

The "Off Limits" hotline was created in 2017 and sold to the public as a game-changer, a 24/7 hotline to fight sexual harassment on L.A. Metro's systems, while behind closed doors, a series of lucrative no-bid contracts were awarded to L.A. based charity Peace Over Violence to run the hotline for more than $800,000.

Now, a Metro whistleblower has come forward to FOX 11 to pull back the curtain on how the hotline came to be and to expose what she says is political backscratching at the expense of taxpayers.

"it was costing taxpayers anywhere from three to eight thousand dollars per call," said Jennifer Loew.

"They wanted to hide it from you as taxpayers in L.A. County, and I'm here to expose it."

According to Van Laar of RedState, a federal investigation is underway.