The two paths to overcoming the election fraud

It seems to me there are only two routes to electoral salvation for President Trump, both narrow, with treacherous cliffs beside both paths:

1. State legislatures, convinced that result-changing fraud occurred in their states, through direct evidence in Giuliani's suits and overwhelming statistical evidence/gross improbabilities verging on impossibilities, refuse to certify electors, thereby depriving Biden of an electoral vote majority and giving Trump the chance for a 26-24 vote victory in the House.

2. Review by the United States Supreme Court of a potential result-changing case or combined cases.

Both are long shots.

The first is a long shot because of the usual Republican cowardice, susceptibility to pressure and bribery, and widespread state office-holder preference for approval by the great and the good, with all the career rewards that approval ensures.  Perhaps, when the utterly damning evidence rolls out, a massive direct contact campaign by Republican voters could inject some spine into Republican legislators.  Perhaps.

The second, the Supreme Court, is a long shot because it would take multiple cases to change the outcome, unless result-changing fraud in a sufficient number of states somehow could be combined in one case (highly improbable), or, conceivably, rulings in several lower court cases could be obtained sufficiently quickly to be considered by the Supreme Court as one — also difficult to imagine, given how slowly trial courts move, even when they move "fast." 

The best route to the Supreme Court would seem to be for enough lower courts to enjoin elector certification as to preclude a constitutionally timely majority in the Electoral College; then the U.S. Supreme Court might be compelled to take up the matter. If lower court injunctions/temporary restraining orders are issued quickly, it's still hard to see how there's time to get a potentially result-changing appealable ruling, or series of rulings, in lower courts, which in turn the U.S. Supreme Court could take up as one matter.

And the time constraint/multiple case problem does not even address a huge concern were a case to reach the high court judges: that some conservative justices might fear, justifiably, that failing — i.e., a Biden victory despite a 5-4 Supreme Court effort to redress the fraud (we will not get the cowardly Roberts), would be followed by Congress' infliction of great institutional damage on the Court through packing (after the two Georgia Senate seats are stolen).

But the fight must go on, and Trump must not concede.  The process ultimately may have educational value despite the news blackout.  And, as I've observed before, it's a difficult process to get evidence of electoral fraud right after an election; it's as good as impossible after the election is cold.

How do civilizations fall?  Slowly for a long time, then very fast. 

We may have reached very fast. 

Given demographics and the left's control of the educational institutions, it was bound to come soon.

Graphic credit: Nick YoungsonAttribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license

It seems to me there are only two routes to electoral salvation for President Trump, both narrow, with treacherous cliffs beside both paths:

1. State legislatures, convinced that result-changing fraud occurred in their states, through direct evidence in Giuliani's suits and overwhelming statistical evidence/gross improbabilities verging on impossibilities, refuse to certify electors, thereby depriving Biden of an electoral vote majority and giving Trump the chance for a 26-24 vote victory in the House.

2. Review by the United States Supreme Court of a potential result-changing case or combined cases.

Both are long shots.

The first is a long shot because of the usual Republican cowardice, susceptibility to pressure and bribery, and widespread state office-holder preference for approval by the great and the good, with all the career rewards that approval ensures.  Perhaps, when the utterly damning evidence rolls out, a massive direct contact campaign by Republican voters could inject some spine into Republican legislators.  Perhaps.

The second, the Supreme Court, is a long shot because it would take multiple cases to change the outcome, unless result-changing fraud in a sufficient number of states somehow could be combined in one case (highly improbable), or, conceivably, rulings in several lower court cases could be obtained sufficiently quickly to be considered by the Supreme Court as one — also difficult to imagine, given how slowly trial courts move, even when they move "fast." 

The best route to the Supreme Court would seem to be for enough lower courts to enjoin elector certification as to preclude a constitutionally timely majority in the Electoral College; then the U.S. Supreme Court might be compelled to take up the matter. If lower court injunctions/temporary restraining orders are issued quickly, it's still hard to see how there's time to get a potentially result-changing appealable ruling, or series of rulings, in lower courts, which in turn the U.S. Supreme Court could take up as one matter.

And the time constraint/multiple case problem does not even address a huge concern were a case to reach the high court judges: that some conservative justices might fear, justifiably, that failing — i.e., a Biden victory despite a 5-4 Supreme Court effort to redress the fraud (we will not get the cowardly Roberts), would be followed by Congress' infliction of great institutional damage on the Court through packing (after the two Georgia Senate seats are stolen).

But the fight must go on, and Trump must not concede.  The process ultimately may have educational value despite the news blackout.  And, as I've observed before, it's a difficult process to get evidence of electoral fraud right after an election; it's as good as impossible after the election is cold.

How do civilizations fall?  Slowly for a long time, then very fast. 

We may have reached very fast. 

Given demographics and the left's control of the educational institutions, it was bound to come soon.

Graphic credit: Nick YoungsonAttribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license