Where is compassion for the millions who have suffered harm from lockdowns?

I'm sure many Americans are growing tired of being labeled "insensitive" or "uncaring" or lacking compassion because we are perceived as not caring about "at-risk" people who might contract the coronavirus.  Let's talk about "compassion for our fellow man."

Where's the compassion for the single mom who is increasingly struggling to purchase diapers or baby formula for her children?  Where's the compassion for the victims of child abuse, which is no doubt spiking due to the economic slowdown?

Where's the compassion for those who have committed suicide or attempted suicide or will do either in coming months and years?

Where's the compassion for the tens of thousands of business-owners who have permanently closed their businesses, or for the tens of millions of unemployed former employees?  Where's the compassion for those who have been forced to declare bankruptcy, or are agonizing over doing this?

Where's the compassion for the millions of college students who are experiencing increased levels of anxiety and depression over draconian campus policies that keep them isolated and prevents them from receiving a real education? 

Where's the compassion for the younger schoolchildren who are unnecessarily living in fear?  Where's the compassion for the same children who can't even play or socialize with other children anymore?

Where's the compassion for the hundreds of millions of people in impoverished nations who will suffer famine, misery, or death because food logistic systems are falling apart?

Where's the compassion for those who spent weeks or months in a hospital — for every health reason — and could not spend a minute with their loved ones, many dying alone? 

Where's the compassion for family members who received no comfort from neighbors and friends after a loved one died because these people were not allowed to attend the funeral?

I'm not even mentioning the terrifying disappearance of fundamental rights and liberties that are being forfeited at a mind-boggling pace, or the growth of authoritarian governments.  Or our "new normal," which now censors and bullies those who happen to hold opposing views.

Do most Americans now believe that less freedom and more government control will benefit mankind? 

Has anyone else noticed the surge in violent crimes occurring in practically every city in this country?

One would be hard pressed to find individuals who lack compassion for those who have died due to COVID.  However,  common sense tells us that  "higher-risk" citizens are smart enough to take their own precautions. 

The argument that we should essentially lock down the world — and everyone should live in constant fear even if his own risks are minuscule — has transformed our country into a grim, unrecognizable place.

COVID has claimed and will continue to claim lives, but 99.9 percent of the country's population will not die from this virus.

By now, practically every family in the country has already experienced negative consequences or obvious harm...not from the virus, but from the policy responses to the virus.  If normal activities continue to be prohibited, the number of Americans who will suffer life-altering hardships will approach 100 percent of our population.

My question: Where's the compassion for these hundreds of millions of people?

Bill Rice, Jr. is a freelance writer in Troy, Alabama.  He can be reached by email at wjricejunior@gmail.com.

Image: Tumisu, Pixabay.

I'm sure many Americans are growing tired of being labeled "insensitive" or "uncaring" or lacking compassion because we are perceived as not caring about "at-risk" people who might contract the coronavirus.  Let's talk about "compassion for our fellow man."

Where's the compassion for the single mom who is increasingly struggling to purchase diapers or baby formula for her children?  Where's the compassion for the victims of child abuse, which is no doubt spiking due to the economic slowdown?

Where's the compassion for those who have committed suicide or attempted suicide or will do either in coming months and years?

Where's the compassion for the tens of thousands of business-owners who have permanently closed their businesses, or for the tens of millions of unemployed former employees?  Where's the compassion for those who have been forced to declare bankruptcy, or are agonizing over doing this?

Where's the compassion for the millions of college students who are experiencing increased levels of anxiety and depression over draconian campus policies that keep them isolated and prevents them from receiving a real education? 

Where's the compassion for the younger schoolchildren who are unnecessarily living in fear?  Where's the compassion for the same children who can't even play or socialize with other children anymore?

Where's the compassion for the hundreds of millions of people in impoverished nations who will suffer famine, misery, or death because food logistic systems are falling apart?

Where's the compassion for those who spent weeks or months in a hospital — for every health reason — and could not spend a minute with their loved ones, many dying alone? 

Where's the compassion for family members who received no comfort from neighbors and friends after a loved one died because these people were not allowed to attend the funeral?

I'm not even mentioning the terrifying disappearance of fundamental rights and liberties that are being forfeited at a mind-boggling pace, or the growth of authoritarian governments.  Or our "new normal," which now censors and bullies those who happen to hold opposing views.

Do most Americans now believe that less freedom and more government control will benefit mankind? 

Has anyone else noticed the surge in violent crimes occurring in practically every city in this country?

One would be hard pressed to find individuals who lack compassion for those who have died due to COVID.  However,  common sense tells us that  "higher-risk" citizens are smart enough to take their own precautions. 

The argument that we should essentially lock down the world — and everyone should live in constant fear even if his own risks are minuscule — has transformed our country into a grim, unrecognizable place.

COVID has claimed and will continue to claim lives, but 99.9 percent of the country's population will not die from this virus.

By now, practically every family in the country has already experienced negative consequences or obvious harm...not from the virus, but from the policy responses to the virus.  If normal activities continue to be prohibited, the number of Americans who will suffer life-altering hardships will approach 100 percent of our population.

My question: Where's the compassion for these hundreds of millions of people?

Bill Rice, Jr. is a freelance writer in Troy, Alabama.  He can be reached by email at wjricejunior@gmail.com.

Image: Tumisu, Pixabay.