Watch Ice Cube responding to backlash over Trump collaboration

Rapper Ice Cube appeared on CNN with Chris Cuomo to discuss his announced collaboration with President Trump on helping black America.  Chris Cuomo only wanted to capitalize on the backlash this rapper got from the hip-hop and black community for being willing to dialogue with Trump.  He doesn't really give a damn about him; it's all for ratings.

The ten-minute video is embedded below.

I wish Cube would have just kept it simple and said, "Yeah Chris, I'm banging with Trump because he's the only one interested in real solutions for us. "

Ice woke up; he doesn't have to explain himself, especially to people like Cuomo. 

Ice Cube is a young man who grew up in gang-infested South Central Los Angeles, who had one of the most hard-hitting and impactful influences on music in history.  His first group, NWA, was one of the most Black Nationalist musical groups you could find.

Ice Cube has been vocal about everything real coming from the hood, and he, along with Dr. Dre and a few others, made themselves into billionaires.

I was infuriated with Chris Cuomo trying to change the narrative of what this highly influential and successful young black man was talking about, and I'm glad he set him straight.

Ice Cube's right: it's about economics, and Trump has demonstrated a genuine interest in helping the black community prosper.  The truth of the matter is that right about now, with all that is going on, both parties are looking to legitimize themselves with African-Americans for their votes.

Chris, like his arrogant brother, talks all big and bad, but I live in New York City and see it falling into the abyss.  Unless federal aid comes in, we're done for.

I am happy to see this young man have the courage to think for himself and look for solutions instead of continuing to blame white America for black Americans' problems.

We've been doing that crap forever, and it hasn't gotten us anywhere, but kept us where we are

We blacks created the "hood" and only we can fix it.

Our so-called black leaders and activists are all charlatans!  They play the race card and sow seeds of discord and divisiveness for self-gain and money.

Al Sharpton lives here in New York in a million-dollar luxury building on the Upper East Side of Manhattan:  ain't a black person in sight!  (THEY CAN'T AFFORD IT.)

 I will never forget being incarcerated and fed with radical concepts and views on race.

 I started to ask questions and challenge what I was being taught:

"If what you say is true, and the white man is inherently evil and designed these cages we're in (prison cells) for black people:

"Then, why is it that the majority of us, including myself, are in here for committing crimes against other blacks?

"The 'white man' didn't tell me to go out and rob people; I chose to do it."

"You ain't talking right Brother."

"Why?!  Because I refuse to continue to blame white people for my being (in) here?"

I was banished and ostracized from the black movement groups and forced to fend for myself inside a notorious maximum-security prison.  I had to fight and hold my own against sexual predators and other sickos.  People who looked just like me and saw me as a piece of fresh meat.

"You don't have anyone to protect you now."

My eyes were opened to the fallacy of the "Black Lives Matter" movement before it even came into existence.  

Photo credit: YouTube screen grab.

Rapper Ice Cube appeared on CNN with Chris Cuomo to discuss his announced collaboration with President Trump on helping black America.  Chris Cuomo only wanted to capitalize on the backlash this rapper got from the hip-hop and black community for being willing to dialogue with Trump.  He doesn't really give a damn about him; it's all for ratings.

The ten-minute video is embedded below.

I wish Cube would have just kept it simple and said, "Yeah Chris, I'm banging with Trump because he's the only one interested in real solutions for us. "

Ice woke up; he doesn't have to explain himself, especially to people like Cuomo. 

Ice Cube is a young man who grew up in gang-infested South Central Los Angeles, who had one of the most hard-hitting and impactful influences on music in history.  His first group, NWA, was one of the most Black Nationalist musical groups you could find.

Ice Cube has been vocal about everything real coming from the hood, and he, along with Dr. Dre and a few others, made themselves into billionaires.

I was infuriated with Chris Cuomo trying to change the narrative of what this highly influential and successful young black man was talking about, and I'm glad he set him straight.

Ice Cube's right: it's about economics, and Trump has demonstrated a genuine interest in helping the black community prosper.  The truth of the matter is that right about now, with all that is going on, both parties are looking to legitimize themselves with African-Americans for their votes.

Chris, like his arrogant brother, talks all big and bad, but I live in New York City and see it falling into the abyss.  Unless federal aid comes in, we're done for.

I am happy to see this young man have the courage to think for himself and look for solutions instead of continuing to blame white America for black Americans' problems.

We've been doing that crap forever, and it hasn't gotten us anywhere, but kept us where we are

We blacks created the "hood" and only we can fix it.

Our so-called black leaders and activists are all charlatans!  They play the race card and sow seeds of discord and divisiveness for self-gain and money.

Al Sharpton lives here in New York in a million-dollar luxury building on the Upper East Side of Manhattan:  ain't a black person in sight!  (THEY CAN'T AFFORD IT.)

 I will never forget being incarcerated and fed with radical concepts and views on race.

 I started to ask questions and challenge what I was being taught:

"If what you say is true, and the white man is inherently evil and designed these cages we're in (prison cells) for black people:

"Then, why is it that the majority of us, including myself, are in here for committing crimes against other blacks?

"The 'white man' didn't tell me to go out and rob people; I chose to do it."

"You ain't talking right Brother."

"Why?!  Because I refuse to continue to blame white people for my being (in) here?"

I was banished and ostracized from the black movement groups and forced to fend for myself inside a notorious maximum-security prison.  I had to fight and hold my own against sexual predators and other sickos.  People who looked just like me and saw me as a piece of fresh meat.

"You don't have anyone to protect you now."

My eyes were opened to the fallacy of the "Black Lives Matter" movement before it even came into existence.  

Photo credit: YouTube screen grab.